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German Minister for Environment Pushing for End of Glyphosate

The German Federal Minister for the Environment, Svenja Schulze, is calling for pesticide-free compensation areas and a binding date for the phase-out of glyphosate. However, this has annoyed the Federal Minister of Food and Agriculture. EURACTIV Germany’s partner Der Tagesspiegel… Continue Reading →

Scientist Replies to Aluminum Industry's and Medical Industry's False and Misleading Claims of Aluminum Safety

Aluminum.org is a pro-aluminum industry website. It even lists an Aluminum Caucus. This month, I decided to look into their list of “myths” about the safety of aluminum product they promote to see if their claims pass the proof-by-Pubmed test…. Continue Reading →

How to Increase Lung Capacity

Because breathing is essential to life and your lungs are essential to breathing, I would like to share a number of tips to help you improve your lung capacity, which is a measure of how much air your body can… Continue Reading →

Mass HPV Vaccination Plan for the U.S.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) has set an aggressive goal to achieve an 80 percent uptake rate among American children with two doses human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine by 2026. To gain that coverage, 14 million more preteen children would need… Continue Reading →

Helping David Take on Goliath

Climate stewards take aim at herbicides, tout healthy soils It takes good soil for plants to grow healthy and vibrant. It takes brave souls to push for better legislation to make that happen. Last year, environmentalists and organic farmers scored… Continue Reading →

USDA Won't Name Turkey Plants, Despite 164 Illnesses and 1 Death

The public doesn’t need to know which turkey plants have been found to be contaminated with a deadly strain of Salmonella that has infected people in 35 states, federal officials said yesterday in a strongly worded statement. Also, organizations such… Continue Reading →

Treated superalloys demonstrate unprecedented heat resistance

Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory have discovered how to make "superalloys" even more super, extending useful life by thousands of hours. The discovery could improve materials performance for electrical generators and nuclear reactors. The key is to heat and cool… Continue Reading →

Newborn babies’ brain responses to being touched on the face measured for the first time

A newborn baby's brain responds to being touched on the face, according to new research co-led by UCL. Babies use this sense of touch — facial somatosensation — to find and latch onto their mother's nipple, and should have this… Continue Reading →

Color coded: Matching taste with color

Color can impact the taste of food, and our experiences and expectations can affect how we taste food, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest this may have implications for how food and beverage industries should market their products. "The… Continue Reading →

Dodging antibiotic resistance by curbing bacterial evolution

With many disease-causing bacteria ratcheting up their shields against current drugs, new tactics are vital to protect people from treatment-resistant infections. Lowering mutation rates in harmful bacteria might be an as yet untried way to hinder the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant… Continue Reading →

A new lead on a 50-year-old radiation damage mystery

For half a century, researchers have seen loops of displaced atoms appearing inside nuclear reactor steel after exposure to radiation, but no one could work out how. Now, a simulation done by researchers at the University of Michigan, Hunan University… Continue Reading →

From the ashes of a failed pain drug, a new therapeutic path emerges

A surprising discovery about a failed pain drug — and specifically, the pathway it targets, BH4 — could have implications for autoimmunity and cancer. Neuroscientists report that BH4 also functions as a kind of immunological thermostat, raising and lowering the… Continue Reading →

Overflowing crater lakes carved canyons across Mars

Today, most of the water on Mars is locked away in frozen ice caps. But billions of years ago it flowed freely across the surface, forming rushing rivers that emptied into craters, forming lakes and seas. New research led by… Continue Reading →

Majority of HIV persistence during ART due to infected cell proliferation

A majority of the HIV-infected cells that persist in HIV-infected individuals even during suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) originated from cellular proliferation, not viral replication, according to new research published in Nature Communications. Reducing the population size of this "reservoir" of… Continue Reading →

Poncho/VOTiVO 2.0 Boosts Yields Again

BASF looks to bring even more yield to growers with Poncho® /VOTiVO® 2.0, adding a third mode of action to a trusted family of products. Since Poncho came on the scene in 2004, followed by Poncho/VOTiVO in 2011, the products… Continue Reading →

Communal rearing gives mice a competitive edge

Research by scientists at the University of Liverpool suggests that being raised communally makes mice more competitive when they're older. It is well known that in many animals, including humans, early-life experiences have long-lasting effects on the development of behaviours… Continue Reading →

PNW woodlands will be less vulnerable to drought, fire than Rocky Mountain, Sierra forests

Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling by researchers in Oregon State University's College of Forestry shows. The… Continue Reading →

Different types of physical activity offer varying protection against heart disease

While it is well known that physical activity is important for heart health, neither research nor recommendations consistently differentiate between the benefits of different types of physical activity. New research, presented at the ACC Latin America Conference 2018 in Lima,… Continue Reading →

How head injuries lead to serious brain diseases

UCLA biologists have discovered how head injuries adversely affect individual cells and genes that can lead to serious brain disorders. The life scientists provide the first cell "atlas" of the hippocampus — the part of the brain that helps regulate… Continue Reading →

Zimfo Bytes 11/16

Farmer’s Business Network, Inc. is now offering a full range of crop insurance products and services through its affiliate FBN Insurance LLC. Farmers interested in new coverage offerings supported by FBN’s technology and analytical capabilities can get a free personal… Continue Reading →

Kilogram, ampere, kelvin and mole redefined

Today, in a landmark decision, representatives from 60 countries voted to redefine the International System of Units (SI), changing the world's definition of the kilogram, the ampere, the kelvin and the mole, forever. The decision, made at the General Conference… Continue Reading →

Half of the world’s annual precipitation falls in just 12 days

Currently, half of the world's measured precipitation that falls in a year falls in just 12 days, according to a new analysis of data collected at weather stations across the globe. By century's end, climate models project that this lopsided… Continue Reading →

Playing high school football changes the teenage brain

A single season of high school football may be enough to cause microscopic changes in the structure of the brain, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, Duke University and the University of North… Continue Reading →

Social isolation linked to higher risk of death

A large American Cancer Society study links social isolation with a higher risk of death from all causes combined and heart disease for all races studied, and with increased cancer mortality in white men and women. The study, appearing in… Continue Reading →

Artificial intelligence predicts treatment effectiveness

How can a doctor predict the treatment outcome of an individual patient? Traditionally, the effectiveness of medical treatments is studied by randomised trials where patients are randomly divided into two groups: one of the groups is given treatment, and the… Continue Reading →

Proteins cooperate to break up energy structures in oxygen starved heart cells

During a heart attack the supply of oxygen to heart cells is decreased. This reduced oxygen level, called hypoxia, causes the cell's powerhouses, the mitochondria, to fragment, impairing cell function and leading to heart failure. Until now, few details were… Continue Reading →

Universal laws in impact dynamics of dust agglomerates under microgravity conditions

Everybody is familiar with granular clusters — while making a cake in the kitchen, you see that the flour forms clumps. Porous dust agglomerates — clumps of clumps of dust grains — are considered to be building materials in the… Continue Reading →

Affordable catalyst for CO2 recycling

A catalyst for carbon dioxide recycling, Mineral pentlandite may also be a conceivable alternative to expensive precious metal catalysts. This is the result of a study conducted by researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), Fritz-Haber Institute Berlin and Fraunhofer Umsicht in… Continue Reading →

The engineering work of ants can influence paleoclimatic studies

The paleontological site of Somosaguas (Madrid) hosts a large colony of ants of the species Messor barbarus. A study has now revealed that the daily activity of these insects modifies soil composition and therefore influences the results obtained in paleoclimatic… Continue Reading →

Long-term exposure to road traffic noise may increase the risk of obesity

Long term exposure to road traffic noise is associated with increased risk of obesity. This was the conclusion of a study involving the participation of the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a research centre supported by the "la Caixa"… Continue Reading →

Eleven seal species narrowly escaped extinction

Their fur was used as a raw material for coats; their fat was used for oil lamps and cosmetics: right up to the end of the nineteenth century, millions of seals were being hunted and killed every year worldwide. The… Continue Reading →

Controlling organ growth with light

In optogenetics, researchers use light to control protein activity. This technique allows them to alter the shape of embryonic tissue and to inhibit the development of abnormalities. Now, scientists in EMBL's De Renzis group have enhanced the technique to stop… Continue Reading →

Channels for the supply of energy

Working in cooperation with international colleagues, researchers from the University of Freiburg have described how water-insoluble membrane proteins are transported through the aqueous space between the mitochondrial membranes with the aid of chaperone proteins. The membrane proteins enable the cellular… Continue Reading →

3D chemical maps of single bacteria

Scientists at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) — a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory — have used ultrabright x-rays to image single bacteria with higher spatial resolution than… Continue Reading →

Predatory behavior of Florida’s skull-collecting ant

"Add 'skull-collecting ant' to the list of strange creatures in Florida," says Adrian Smith a scientist at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and North Carolina State University. His new research describes the behavioral and chemical strategies of a… Continue Reading →

New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease

Researchers have developed a new technique to analyse cell membrane proteins in situ which could revolutionise the way in which we study diseases, such as cancer, metabolic and heart diseases. The discovery was made as part of an international research… Continue Reading →

Human pharmaceuticals change cricket personality

Crickets that are exposed to human drugs that alter serotonin levels in the brain are less active and less aggressive than crickets that have had no drug exposure, according to a new study led by researchers from Linköping University. The… Continue Reading →

An Indigenous Alaskan Chef Shares Traditional Recipes By Way Of YouTube

Rob Kinneen didn’t take his first bite of fresh asparagus until adulthood, when he was a student at the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in New York. “That was one of the first times I realized vegetables could taste good,”… Continue Reading →

Severe eczema may best be treated by allergy shots

If you've suffered with severe atopic dermatitis (eczema) for a long time and have tried what you think is every available option for relief, you may want to consider allergy shots. A medically-challenging case being presented at the American College… Continue Reading →

Milk allergy affects half of US food-allergic kids under age 1

Although parents often focus on peanuts as the food allergy they need to worry about most, cow's milk is the most common food allergy in children under the age of 5. New research being presented at the American College of… Continue Reading →

Sucking your baby’s pacifier to clean it may prevent allergies

If the thought of sucking your baby's pacifier to clean it and then popping it in your baby's mouth grosses you out, think again. New research being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific… Continue Reading →

Establishment of the immortalized cell line derived from Okinawa rail (endangered species)

The number of critically endangered animals has been increasing in recent years. According to data from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), 1375 avian species are categorized as being endangered animals, and around 12% of the endangered… Continue Reading →

Safest way to dine out for those with food allergies is using up to 15 strategies

People with food allergies know eating at a restaurant means using multiple strategies to make sure your order doesn't contain something that could send you to the hospital with anaphylaxis — a severe life-threatening reaction. New research being presented at… Continue Reading →

SA Government Rejects Monsanto's Triple Stacked GM Drought Tolerant Maize

The African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) welcomes the decision of the South African biosafety authorities, rejecting Monsanto’s application for the commercial release of its GM drought tolerant triple stacked maize: MON 87460 x MON 89034 x NK 603. At its… Continue Reading →

What's Behind the CDC Claiming 80,000 Died from Flu Last Winter?

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the 2017-2018 flu season was the deadliest flu season in the U.S. in four decades, hospitalizing 900,000 and killing 80,000, including 180 children. According to CNN,1 " … [F]lu-related… Continue Reading →

35+ Natural & DIY Christmas Gifts Ideas

This year, we’ve decided to keep things simple, natural and sustainable with homemade, natural and DIY Christmas Gift Ideas (and a few select wooden toys for the kids that will (hopefully) last for generations). We are also trying to focus… Continue Reading →

NAFB Foundation Silent Auction Microphone Winner

To support the NAFB Foundation our AgNewsWire service donated a microphone that the winner could have painted in their own custom colors. Congratulations to Susan Littlefield, Rural Radio Network, for the winning bid in the Foundation Silent Auction during the… Continue Reading →

Engineered DNA-encoded PCSK9 inhibitors may provide an effective alternative for treating high cholesterol

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have developed novel synthetic DNA-encoded monoclonal antibodies (DMAbs) directed against PCSK9, a protein key to regulating cholesterol levels in the bloodstream. Results of preclinical studies showed a significant cholesterol decrease, opening the door for further… Continue Reading →

Drop your weapons!

Animal weapons such as antlers, tusks and limbs specialized for fighting require a large energy expenditure to produce and may cost even more to maintain. Because the leaf-footed bug sheds its large hind limbs, used as weapons in male-male battles,… Continue Reading →

Animal populations are shrinking due to their high-risk food-finding strategies

A study using animal-attached technology to measure food consumption in four very different wild vertebrates has revealed that animals using a high-risk strategy to find rarer food are particularly susceptible to becoming extinct, as they fail to gather food for… Continue Reading →

Farm Bureau Thanksgiving Dinner Survey

For the 33rd year in a row the American Farm Bureau Federation has released its survey of prices for food items on the traditional Thanksgiving Day dinner table, and the average cost of this year’s feast for 10 is $48.90,… Continue Reading →

What Turkey Producers Don't Want You to Know

As Turkey Day approaches, animal lovers cringe, food safety advocates become vigilant and industrial turkey producers hope you aren’t reading the news. Specifically, the purveyors of factory farm turkeys hope you haven’t heard about the latest turkey salmonella outbreak in… Continue Reading →

‘Smart skin’ simplifies spotting strain in structures

Thanks to one peculiar characteristic of carbon nanotubes, engineers will soon be able to measure the accumulated strain in an airplane, a bridge or a pipeline — or just about anything — over the entire surface or down to microscopic… Continue Reading →

Omega-3 fatty acids reduce the risk of premature birth

A new Cochrane Review published today has found that increasing the intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) during pregnancy reduces the risk of premature births. Premature birth is the leading cause of death for children under 5 years… Continue Reading →

FMC Introduces Ethos 3D

Participants at the 2018 National Association of Farm Broadcasting Trade Talk event learned more about Ethos® 3D insecticide/fungicide from FMC. The product is formulated specifically for the 3RIVE 3D® in-furrow application system that converts traditional high-volume applications to low-volume applications… Continue Reading →

Dietary fat is good? Dietary fat is bad? Coming to consensus

Which is better, a low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet or a high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet — or is it the type of fat that matters? In a new paper featured on the cover of Science magazine's special issue on nutrition, researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan… Continue Reading →

A bigger nose, a bigger bang: Size matters for ecoholocating toothed whales

Trying to find your lunch in the dark using a narrow flashlight to illuminate one place at a time may not seem like the most efficient way of foraging. However, if you replace light with sound, this seems to be… Continue Reading →

New inflammation inhibitor discovered

A multidisciplinary team of researchers led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed an anti-inflammatory drug molecule with a new mechanism of action. By inhibiting a certain protein, the researchers were able to reduce the signals that trigger an inflammation…. Continue Reading →

Making moves and memories, are they connected?

It is known that certain areas of the brain are responsible for certain functions of the body. The cerebellum, a structure found in the back of the skull, is known to be important for the control of movement, while the… Continue Reading →

Bursting bubbles launch bacteria from water to air

Wherever there's water, there's bound to be bubbles floating at the surface. From standing puddles, lakes, and streams, to swimming pools, hot tubs, public fountains, and toilets, bubbles are ubiquitous, indoors and out. A new MIT study shows how bubbles… Continue Reading →

Astronomers find possible elusive star behind supernova

Astronomers may have finally uncovered the long-sought progenitor to a specific type of exploding star by sifting through NASA Hubble Space Telescope archival data. The supernova, called a Type Ic, is thought to detonate after its massive star has shed… Continue Reading →

Astronomers detect once-in-a-lifetime gamma rays

Scientists have discovered something amazing. In a cluster of some of the most massive and luminous stars in our galaxy, about 5,000 light years from Earth, astronomers detected particles being accelerated by a rapidly rotating neutron star as it passed… Continue Reading →

First-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection" — the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion — in the Earth's magnetotail, the… Continue Reading →

Solar panels for yeast cell biofactories

Genetically engineered microbes such as bacteria and yeasts have long been used as living factories to produce drugs and fine chemicals. More recently, researchers have started to combine bacteria with semiconductor technology that, similar to solar panels on the roof… Continue Reading →

Nanofiber carpet could lead to new sticky or insulating surfaces

Inspired by the extraordinary characteristics of polar bear fur, lotus leaves and gecko feet, engineering researchers have developed a new way to make arrays of nanofibers that could bring us coatings that are sticky, repellent, insulating or light emitting, among… Continue Reading →

Warning: Chemical weapons risk during a period of very rapid scientific change

Alarming examples of the dangers from chemical weapons have been seen recently in the use of industrial chemicals and the nerve agent sarin against civilians in Syria, and in the targeted assassination operations using VX nerve agent in Malaysia and… Continue Reading →

Trans-galactic streamers feeding most luminous galaxy in the universe

The most luminous galaxy in the universe has been caught in the act of stripping away nearly half the mass from at least three of its smaller neighbors, according to a new study published in the journal Science. The light… Continue Reading →

Corn Growers Partner With Environmental Defense Fund

The National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) is joining forces with the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) to address one of the most pressing challenges for farmers, rural communities and natural resources – how to improve environmental outcomes while optimizing productivity and… Continue Reading →

Growth Energy Celebrates 10th Anniversary

Growth Energy was first announced this month in 2008 so they are now officially 10 years old. At the NAFB Convention Trade Talk last week, Growth Energy CEO Emily Skor shared some of the many accomplishments the organization has made… Continue Reading →

Songbirds set long-distance migration record

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have studied flight routes to determine how far willow warblers migrate in the autumn. The results show that the willow warbler holds a long-distance migration record in the ten-gram weight category — with the… Continue Reading →

No link between ‘hypoallergenic’ dogs and lower risk of childhood asthma

Growing up with dogs is linked to a lower risk of asthma, especially if the dogs are female, a new study from Karolinska Institutet and Uppsala University in Sweden shows. However, the researchers found no relation between 'allergy friendly' breeds… Continue Reading →

What did birds and insects do during the 2017 solar eclipse?

In August of 2017, millions peered through protective eyewear at the solar eclipse — the first total eclipse visible in the continental United States in nearly 40 years. During the event, researchers from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the… Continue Reading →

Should you eat a low-gluten diet?

An increasing number of people choose a low-gluten diet, even though they are not allergic to the dietary substance. This trend has sparked public debate about whether or not low-gluten diets are recommendable for people without allergies. Now, researchers from… Continue Reading →

Population of rare Stone’s sheep 20% smaller than previously thought

The already-rare Stone's sheep of the Yukon is 20 per cent less common than previously thought, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. The study examined 123 different DNA markers in approximately 2,800 thinhorn sheep in British Columbia… Continue Reading →

Humpback whales come to the Mediterranean to feed themselves

Although the presence of humpback whales in the Mediterranean has been considered unusual, it is known that their visits have increased in the last 150 years. Until now, there had been no clear reason to justify this fact, with various… Continue Reading →

Scorpion venom to shuttle drugs into the brain

The Peptides and Proteins lab at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) has published a paper in Chemical Communications describing the capacity of a small protein (a peptide) derived from chlorotoxin, found in scorpion venom (Giant Yellow Israeli… Continue Reading →

Android child’s face strikingly expressive

Japan's affection for robots is no secret. But is the feeling mutual in the country's amazing androids? We may now be a step closer to giving androids greater facial expressions to communicate with. While robots have featured in advances in… Continue Reading →

Insect antibiotic provides new way to eliminate bacteria

An antibiotic called thanatin attacks the way the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is built. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now found out that this happens through a previously unknown mechanism. Thanatin, produced naturally by the spined soldier… Continue Reading →

NASA learns more about interstellar visitor ‘Oumuamua

In November 2017, scientists pointed NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope toward the object known as 'Oumuamua — the first known interstellar object to visit our solar system. The infrared Spitzer was one of many telescopes pointed at 'Oumuamua in the weeks… Continue Reading →

Black Migrants: Photographs of California’s Forgotten Agricultural Past

California’s Latinx farmworkers have been the subjects of many documentary projects over the years, but very few people documented the history of Black farmworkers in the state. Now, an exhibition at the Fresno Museum of Art called Black Migrants features… Continue Reading →

Climate change likely caused migration, demise of ancient Indus Valley civilization

More than 4,000 years ago, the Harappa culture thrived in the Indus River Valley of what is now modern Pakistan and northwestern India, where they built sophisticated cities, invented sewage systems that predated ancient Rome's, and engaged in long-distance trade… Continue Reading →

Drug combination makes cancer disappear in mice with neuroblastoma

Researchers investigating new treatments for neuroblastoma — one of the most common childhood cancers — have found that a combination of two drugs made tumours disappear in mice, making it more effective than any other drugs tested in these animals…. Continue Reading →

Breakthrough in treatment of restless legs syndrome

New research published in the Journal of Physiology presents a breakthrough in the treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). RLS is a common condition of the nervous system that causes an overwhelming irresistible urge to move the legs. Patients complain… Continue Reading →

Introducing USFRA 2.0

In Kansas City last week, the U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance (USFRA) introduced its refined focus, the new Farmer Ambassador network, and 2019 projects that connect food and agriculture stakeholders to enable better decision making. Speaking to affiliate members and… Continue Reading →

GROWMARK Simulator Aids Training

Using a sprayer simulator for training is not new to members of GROWMARK and FS System companies, but a virtual reality (VR) component is a recent addition. “It’s helped out our training quite a bit because you can move around… Continue Reading →

ASTA Talks Seed and Trade at #NAFB18

The American Seed Trade Association (ASTA) team attended the NAFB Trade Talk last week and discussed what their name is all about – seed and trade. ASTA CEO Andy LaVigne says trade is critical for the seed industry and acceptance… Continue Reading →

A world without brick-and-mortar stores? Even avid online shoppers say, ‘no, thanks’

It has been dubbed the "retail apocalypse" — the widespread shuttering of brick-and-mortar stores across America in the wake of online shopping's skyrocketing popularity. But how do consumers feel about this changing retail landscape? University of Arizona researcher Sabrina Helm… Continue Reading →

Microgel powder fights infection and helps wounds heal

While making smart glue, a team of engineers discovered a handy byproduct: hydrogen peroxide. In microgel form, it reduces bacteria and virus ability to infect by at least 99 percent. Hao Meng's doctoral project focused on biocompatibility testing and pulling… Continue Reading →

Natural solutions can reduce global warming

Restoring the United States' lands and coastal wetlands could have a much bigger role in reducing global warming than previously thought, according to the most comprehensive national assessment to date of how greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced and stored… Continue Reading →

Massive impact crater from a kilometer-wide iron meteorite discovered in Greenland

An international team lead by researchers from the Centre for GeoGenetics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen have discovered a 31-km wide meteorite impact crater buried beneath the ice-sheet in the northern Greenland. This is the… Continue Reading →

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