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Killing the liver-stage malaria parasite with baculovirus: a drug discovery approach

Currently, few antimalarial treatments exist that effectively kill liver-stage malaria parasites, which can lay dormant for months or years as in the case of Plasmodium vivax. Researchers from Kanazawa University have successfully demonstrated that administration of a baculovirus virion (BV)… Continue Reading →

Deep-learning technique reveals ‘invisible’ objects in the dark

Small imperfections in a wine glass or tiny creases in a contact lens can be tricky to make out, even in good light. In almost total darkness, images of such transparent features or objects are nearly impossible to decipher. But… Continue Reading →

Marketing: Putting a price on reputation

Consumers are willing to pay more for products that not only have the features they want but also are delivered by businesses with a good reputation, new research has found. The study, by researchers at the University of Technology Sydney… Continue Reading →

Fighting obesity: Could it be as plain as dirt?

It costs the global economy an estimated US$2 trillion annually and has been dubbed a modern day health epidemic, but new research from the University of South Australia has unearthed a possible cure for obesity — and it is as… Continue Reading →

The stiffest porous lightweight materials ever

3D printing and other additive production techniques make it possible to manufacture materials with internal structures of previously unimaginable complexity. This is interesting for lightweight construction, too, as it enables the development of materials that have the highest possible share… Continue Reading →

Craft Beermakers are Banding Together and Brewing for Good

Around sunrise on Thursday, November 8, the first flames of the most destructive wildfire in California history flickered to life along Camp Creek Road in Northern California. The Camp Fire spread rapidly, overtaking the towns of Concow and Paradise within… Continue Reading →

Improved understanding of the pathology of dwarfism may lead to new treatment targets

Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is a severe inherited dwarfing condition characterized by disproportionate short stature, joint laxity, pain, and early onset osteoarthritis. In PSACH, a genetic mutation leads to abnormal retention of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)… Continue Reading →

Researchers developing nonopioid drug for chronic pain

Researchers from the Virginia Tech School of Neuroscience are teaming with the University of California San Diego and the U.S. National Institutes of Health to develop a drug — now in its earliest stages — that can treat certain types… Continue Reading →

Faster, cheaper test can help predict risk of metastasis in prostate cancer patients

For men newly diagnosed with prostate cancer or patients previously treated, the risk of metastasis is a crucial determinant of whether to choose conservative management or undergo further treatment. For prostate as well as other cancers, primary tumor growth or… Continue Reading →

Fire’s effects on soil moisture, runoff

Fire and water. Timeless, opposing forces, they are actually linked in powerful ways that can have major impacts on communities and ecosystems. The 2011 Las Conchas mega-fire in New Mexico burned more than 150,000 acres and threatened the Los Alamos… Continue Reading →

College textbooks largely overlook the most common animals

A recent study of textbooks aimed at introductory biology courses finds that they devote less than one percent of their text to discussing insects, which make up more than 60 percent of animal species. The study authors argue that this… Continue Reading →

What Is Behind the Spread of a Mysterious Allergy to Meat?

Thousands of people are developing life-threatening reactions to animal products – and a single tiny creature is to blame. It was early morning in early summer, and I was tracing my way through the woods of central North Carolina, steering… Continue Reading →

Through Regenerative Agriculture, Dr. Bronner's Is Setting a New Example

On “Food Talk with Dani Nierenberg,” David Bronner, Cosmic Engagement Officer (CEO) of Dr. Bronner’s, talks about how the natural products company is setting a new standard for companies at the First Annual San Diego Food Tank Summit. Dr. Bronner’s… Continue Reading →

Novel technique may significantly reduce breast biopsies

A novel technique that uses mammography to determine the biological tissue composition of a tumor could help reduce unnecessary breast biopsies, according to a new study appearing in the journal Radiology. Mammography has been effective at reducing deaths from breast… Continue Reading →

Sun-soaking device turns water into superheated steam

MIT engineers have built a device that soaks up enough heat from the sun to boil water and produce "superheated" steam hotter than 100 degrees Celsius, without any expensive optics. On a sunny day, the structure can passively pump out… Continue Reading →

New review of scientific studies confirms food cravings can be reduced

Food craving, the intense desire to eat certain foods, can sabotage efforts to maintain healthy eating habits and body weight, no matter the time of year. However, an examination of 28 current peer-reviewed scientific studies largely substantiates findings that changes… Continue Reading →

New models sense human trust in smart machines

New "classification models" sense how well humans trust intelligent machines they collaborate with, a step toward improving the quality of interactions and teamwork. The long-term goal of the overall field of research is to design intelligent machines capable of changing… Continue Reading →

Workplace exposure to pesticides and metals linked to heightened heart disease risk

Workplace exposure to metals and pesticides is linked to a heightened risk of heart disease in Hispanic and Latino workers, reveals research published online in the journal Heart. Language barriers and low levels of education, coupled with fears about job… Continue Reading →

Trying to get people to agree? Skip the French restaurant and go out for Chinese food

Here's a new negotiating tactic: enjoy a family-style meal with your counterpart before making your opening bid. When people in a business negotiation share not just a meal but a plate, they collaborate better and reach deals faster, according to… Continue Reading →

Taming turbulence: Seeking to make complex simulations a breeze

For scientists wrestling with problems as diverse as containing superhot plasma in a fusion reactor, improving the accuracy of weather forecasts, or probing the unexplained dynamics of a distant galaxy, turbulence-spawning shear flow is a serious complicating factor. Put simply,… Continue Reading →

Disruption of circadian rhythm as risk factor for diseases

USC scientists report that a novel time-keeping mechanism within liver cells that helps sustain key organ tasks can contribute to diseases when its natural rhythm is disrupted. This dual function of the nuclear receptor protein HNF4A offers a potential explanation… Continue Reading →

Are you stressed? Your eyes may provide a window into your mental workload

With nearly breakneck speed, the demands of work productivity in today's society seem to have increased tenfold. Enter multitasking as a way to cope with the insistence that tasks be completed almost immediately. Previous studies on workload and productivity include… Continue Reading →

What social stress in monkeys can tell us about human health

Research in recent years has linked a person's physical or social environment to their well-being. Stress wears down the body and compromises the immune system, leaving a person more vulnerable to illnesses and other conditions. Various stressors, from family adversity… Continue Reading →

Hypoxic dead zones found in urban streams, not just at the coast

Hypoxic dead zones, which occur when dissolved oxygen levels in water drop so low that fish and other aquatic animals living there suffocate, are well-documented problems in many coastal waters. Now, a new Duke University-led study reveals they also occur… Continue Reading →

Farm Bill Delivers Victories for Beginning Farmers, Organic/Local Food

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Contact: Reana KovalcikNational Sustainable Agriculture Coalition202-547-5754, [email protected] Farm Bill Delivers Victories for Beginning Farmers, Organic/Local Food Concerns remain over long-term loss in conservation funding,failure to close farm safety net loopholes Washington, DC, December 11, 2018 – After… Continue Reading →

Guidelines for the therapeutic use of melatonin

Sixty years after melatonin was isolated and with more than 23,000 published studies showing the many functions of this hormone secreted by the pineal gland, guidelines should be discussed and established for its therapeutic use. This is the view expressed… Continue Reading →

Historic earthquakes test Indonesia’s seismic hazard assessment

Using data gleaned from historical reports, researchers have now identified the sources of some of the most destructive Indonesian earthquakes in Java, Bali and Nusa Tenggara, using these data to independently test how well Indonesia's 2010 and 2017 seismic hazard… Continue Reading →

Stop sterilizing your dust

Most people have heard about antibiotic-resistant germs. But how about antibiotic-resistant dust? A new Northwestern University study has found that an antimicrobial chemical called triclosan is abundant in dust — and linked to changes in its genetic makeup. The result… Continue Reading →

Stronger pesticide regulations likely needed to protect all bee species, say studies

Pesticide regulations designed to protect honeybees fail to account for potential health threats posed by agrochemicals to the full diversity of bee species that are even more important pollinators of food crops and other plants, say three new international papers… Continue Reading →

Employee incentives can lead to unethical behavior in the workplace

Considering end-of-year bonuses for your employees? Supervisors be forewarned, a new study finds that while incentive rewards can help motivate and increase employee performance it can also lead to unethical behavior in the workplace. "Goal fixation can have a profound… Continue Reading →

A future for red wolves may be found on Galveston Island, Texas

The American red wolf is one of United States' greatest wildlife conservation stories. Red wolves were on the brink of extinction along the American Gulf Coast during the late 1970s when the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) made a… Continue Reading →

Gut microbiome may affect some anti-diabetes drugs

Why do orally-administered drugs for diabetes work for some people but not others? According to researchers at Wake Forest School of Medicine, bacteria that make up the gut microbiome may be the culprit. In a review of more than 100… Continue Reading →

Alaska earthquakes offer new insight into improving hazard assessment

The 2016 Iniskin earthquake (magnitude 7.1) that shook Anchorage, Alaska, was captured by the seismometers of the EarthScope Transportable Array. This data is helping Geoff Abers, a professor at Cornell University's Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, and Michael Mann,… Continue Reading →

Shape-shifting cell breakthrough

A new computational model developed by researchers from The City College of New York and Yale gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound… Continue Reading →

Internet therapy apps reduce depression symptoms

In a sweeping new study, Indiana University psychologists have found that a series of self-guided, internet-based therapy platforms effectively reduce depression. The work, which reviewed 21 pre-existing studies with a total of 4,781 participants, was published in the November issue… Continue Reading →

New discoveries predict ability to forecast dementia from single molecule

Scientists who recently identified the molecular start of Alzheimer's disease have used that finding to determine that it should be possible to forecast which type of dementia will develop over time — a form of personalized medicine for neurodegenerative diseases…. Continue Reading →

Warming, sea-ice loss: Arctic Report Card tracks region’s environmental changes

NOAA's annual report card on the Arctic, released today at the American Geophysical Union fall meeting in Washington, D.C., measures the changing climate of the polar region including warmer air and ocean temperatures and declines in sea-ice that are driving… Continue Reading →

Degrading permafrost puts Arctic infrastructure at risk by mid-century

Seventy percent of the current infrastructure in the Arctic has a high potential to be affected by thawing permafrost in the next 30 years. Even meeting the climate change targets of the Paris Agreement will not substantially reduce those projected… Continue Reading →

How returning to a prior context briefly heightens memory recall

Whether it's the pleasant experience of returning to one's childhood home over the holidays or the unease of revisiting a site that proved unpleasant, we often find that when we return to a context where an episode first happened, specific… Continue Reading →

Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth — this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in Cell Reports, the scientists… Continue Reading →

Perovskite solar cells: cheaper production and high efficiency

A team of chemists from Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania together with physicists from Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin (HZB) science institute, Germany are offering novel approach for the selective layer formation in perovskite solar cells. The molecule, synthesised by the… Continue Reading →

Transformed: The plant whose sex life fascinated Charles Darwin

Researchers have genetically transformed the Common Primrose (Primula vulgaris) for the first time in a development that could shed light on one of the plant world's most renowned reproductive systems. The complicated sex life of Primula was a subject that… Continue Reading →

Custom-made artificial mother-of-pearl

Natural mother-of-pearl, such as mussels, is one of the hardest, most stable and stiff natural materials. Researchers have always been fascinated by it. The structure of mother-of-pearl is exquisite under the electron microscope; it looks like a miniature brick wall,… Continue Reading →

Parents, kids spend more time discussing how to use mobile technology than talking about content

Most parents would agree that one of the of the biggest modern parenting challenges is monitoring a child's online activity. A new study appearing in the Journal of Child and Family Studies found that parents spend more time talking with… Continue Reading →

New tool for understanding enzymes — Google

Yale scientists have taken a novel approach to unraveling the complex structure and regulation of enzymes: They Googled it. In a new study published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, chemistry professor Victor Batista… Continue Reading →

Hong Kong’s waters benefit health and wellbeing

A ground-breaking study has revealed how spending time in and around Hong Kong's 'blue spaces' (harbours, coastlines and beaches) is linked to better health and wellbeing, especially for older adults. The team found that local residents with a view of… Continue Reading →

Discovery of new neural mechanism underlying anxiety points to possible treatments

According to some estimates, up to one in three people around the world may experience severe anxiety in their lifetime. In a study described today in Cell Reports, researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science have revealed a previously unknown… Continue Reading →

ICESat-2 reveals profile of ice sheets, sea ice, forests

Less than three months into its mission, NASA's Ice, Cloud and land Elevation Satellite-2, or ICESat-2, is already exceeding scientists' expectations. The satellite is measuring the height of sea ice to within an inch, tracing the terrain of previously unmapped… Continue Reading →

52 million tree stories more accessible to science

The world's primary archive of tree ring data, which holds more than 52 million cost-free records spanning 8,000 years of history, has gotten a makeover by scientists from four countries committed to making science more accessible. The co-authors report in… Continue Reading →

Copper compound as promising quantum computing unit

Quantum computers could vastly increase the capabilities of IT systems, bringing major changes worldwide. However, there is still a long way to go before such a device can actually be constructed, because it has not yet been possible to transfer… Continue Reading →

How skin cells protect themselves against stress

The skin is our largest organ, and, among other things, it provides protection against mechanical impacts. To ensure this protection, skin cells have to be connected to one another especially closely. Exactly how this mechanical stability is provided on the… Continue Reading →

Chemical engineers develop new theory to build improved nanomaterials

Thanks in part to their distinct electronic, optical and chemical properties, nanomaterials are utilized in an array of diverse applications from chemical production to medicine and light-emitting devices. But when introducing another metal in their structure, also known as "doping,"… Continue Reading →

Unique immune cell likely drives chronic inflammation

For the first time, researchers have identified that an immune cell subset called gamma delta T cells that may be causing and/or perpetuating the systemic inflammation found in normal aging in the general geriatric population and in HIV-infected people who… Continue Reading →

Did supernovae kill off large ocean animals at dawn of Pleistocene?

About 2.6 million years ago, an oddly bright light arrived in the prehistoric sky and lingered there for weeks or months. It was a supernova some 150 light years away from Earth. Within a few hundred years, long after the… Continue Reading →

Terahertz laser for sensing and imaging outperforms its predecessors

A terahertz laser designed by MIT researchers is the first to reach three key performance goals at once — high constant power, tight beam pattern, and broad electric frequency tuning — and could thus be valuable for a wide range… Continue Reading →

BMI is a good measure of health after all, new study finds

A new study from the University of Bristol supports body mass index (BMI) as a useful tool for assessing obesity and health. A simple measure based on weight and height, BMI is widely used to assess if a person is… Continue Reading →

Taking uncertainty out of cancer prognosis

A cancer diagnosis tells you that you have cancer, but how that cancer will progress is a terrifying uncertainty for most patients. Researchers at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory (CSHL) have now identified a specific class of biomarkers that can tell… Continue Reading →

Possible connection between cardiovascular disease and living near oil and gas wells

Researchers at the Colorado School of Public Health have found a possible connection between the intensity of oil and gas exploration in an area and early indicators of cardiovascular disease among nearby residents. In a pilot study of 97 people… Continue Reading →

Better biomedical devices, wearable displays may result from tiny light-guiding structures

For the first time, researchers have fabricated light-guiding structures known as waveguides just over one micron wide in a clear silicone commonly used for biomedical applications. The tiny, flexible waveguides can be used to make light-based devices such as biomedical… Continue Reading →

Relationship impairments hinder men seeking mental health treatment

Relationship impairment (difficulty managing expectations and requirements within an intimate relationship) plays a role in explaining the association between symptom severity and those seeking treatment among post-9/11 military veterans. However, the role it plays is different for men and women…. Continue Reading →

A correlation between obesity and income has only developed in the past 30 years

It is well known that poorer Americans are more likely to be obese or suffer from diabetes; there is a strong negative correlation between household income and both obesity and diabetes. This negative correlation, however, has only developed in the… Continue Reading →

Can social interactions affect spread of disease?

Most real-world systems, such as biological, social, and economic schemes evolve constantly. The dynamics of such systems are characterized by significantly enhanced activity levels over short periods of time (or "bursts") followed by long periods of inactivity. This is true… Continue Reading →

Researchers identify additional mechanisms at play in insecticide resistance

Researchers at LSTM have used a bioinformatics approach to integrate information from multiple studies on insecticide resistance in mosquitoes and uncovered a number of important resistance mechanisms that had not previously been recognised. In a study published in Nature Communications,… Continue Reading →

How catnip makes the chemical that causes cats to go crazy

Researchers at John Innes Centre have shed light on how catnip — also known as catmint — produces the chemical that sends cats into a state of wanton abandon. The remarkable effect catnip has on cats is well known thanks… Continue Reading →

Citations show academic and non-academic researchers ‘win’ when they collaborate

A new analysis of research citations by University of Maryland professor of computer science Ben Shneiderman indicates that the average number of citations a university research paper receives is progressively boosted by having: (1) more than one author; (2) coauthors… Continue Reading →

Going viral: New cells for norovirus production in the lab

An Osaka University-led research team has developed a system for simply and efficiently producing human norovirus. By coaxing human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) to develop into a type of cell that usually lines the intestine, they created a cellular… Continue Reading →

‘Pest-controlling’ bats could help save rainforests

A new study shows that several species of bats are giving Madagascar's rice farmers a vital pest control service by feasting on plagues of insects. And this, a zoologist at the University of Cambridge believes, can ease the financial pressure… Continue Reading →

Music evokes powerful positive emotions through personal memories

We all have experiences of being emotionally moved after listening to music that we have strong personal memories of or to seeing an image that captures particularly important memories from our life. This new research critically examined the idea of… Continue Reading →

Depression: New tool delivers swifter picture of cognitive deficit

A new tool, developed by researchers from the University of Adelaide, will assist clinicians to assess people suffering from major depressive disorder (MDD). The THINC-integrated tool (THINC-it) digital software tool, developed by researchers from the University of Adelaide's Discipline of… Continue Reading →

Costco’s 100 Million Chickens Will Change the Face of Nebraska

Can a single company reshape a landscape? That’s the question at play in Nebraska, where Costco, one of America’s most powerful companies, has the potential to impact residents, farmers, and the environment in complex and unprecedented ways. At the center… Continue Reading →

Tenacious and flexible goal pursuit gets older people on the move

Tenacious goal pursuit and flexible goal adjustment have been shown to help maintain psychological well-being despite age related challenges and losses. A recent study demonstrates that tenacity and flexibility are beneficial for out-of-home mobility as well. Older people who persistently… Continue Reading →

Plague: One Scientist's Intrepid Search for the Truth About Human Retroviruses and Chronic Disease

Judy Mikovits, Ph.D., a virologist, researcher and founding research director of the Whittemore Peterson Institute — which researches and treats chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in Reno, Nevada — got embroiled in controversy when, in 2009, she was the senior author… Continue Reading →

The Best Technology for Fighting Climate Change Isn't a Technology

Forests are the most powerful and efficient carbon-capture system on the planet The latest IPCC report does not mince words about the state of our planet: we must act now to achieve global change at a scale that has “no… Continue Reading →

Rich Nations Aren't 'Paying Their Fair Share' to Mitigate the Climate Crisis, Says Report Released at COP24

Rich countries—and the United States in particular—aren’t “paying their fair share” in terms of taking concrete actions to mitigate the global climate crisis, according to an independent review released at the COP24 talks in Poland, where world leaders are discussing… Continue Reading →

Increased risk for breast cancer after childbirth may last more than 20 years

The increased risk for breast cancer that occurs after childbirth can last more than 20 years. The risk may be enhanced when a woman is older at first birth or has a family history of breast cancer, and is not… Continue Reading →

Lifespan extension at low temperatures is genetically controlled

Why do we age? Despite more than a century of research (and a vast industry of youth-promising products), what causes our cells and organs to deteriorate with age is still unknown. One known factor is temperature: Many animal species live… Continue Reading →

Small and isolated habitat patches crucial to species survival

Small, local patches of habitat could be playing a much bigger role in conserving biodiversity than you think, according to new research. The global study just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences looked at the conservation… Continue Reading →

Reducing variations in feeding practices and fortifying breast milk helps micro-preemies grow

Standardizing feeding practices, including the timing for fortifying breast milk and formula with essential elements like zinc and protein, improves growth trends for the tiniest preterm infants, according to Children's research presented during the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) 2018… Continue Reading →

Ocean fertilization by unusual microbes extends to frigid waters of Arctic Ocean

Microbes that provide natural fertilizer to the oceans by "fixing" nitrogen from the atmosphere into a form useable by other organisms were once thought to be limited to warm tropical and subtropical waters. Now, however, researchers have documented nitrogen fixation… Continue Reading →

New study finds bias against women and girls when intellectual ability is sought

A new study finds bias against both women and girls for jobs or activities requiring intellectual ability. The research underscores the pervasiveness of gender bias, held even among females, in both adults and young children. "Despite their achievements in the… Continue Reading →

Shape-shifting origami could help antenna systems adapt on the fly

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have devised a method for using an origami-based structure to create radio frequency filters that have adjustable dimensions, enabling the devices to change which signals they block throughout a large range of frequencies…. Continue Reading →

Rapid genetic evolution linked to lighter skin pigmentation

Populations of indigenous people in southern Africa carry a gene that causes lighter skin, and scientists have now identified the rapid evolution of this gene in recent human history. The gene that causes lighter skin pigmentation, SLC24A5, was introduced from… Continue Reading →

Addressing research gaps could help with development of disability-inclusive workplaces

Filling key gaps in the research and understanding of the treatment of people with disabilities in the workplace could help improve employee success on the job and develop more disability-inclusive workplaces, a new review of disability research has shown. People… Continue Reading →

How will the winds of climate change affect migratory birds?

Under future climate scenarios, changing winds may make it harder for North American birds to migrate southward in the autumn, but make it easier for them to come back north in the spring. Researchers from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology… Continue Reading →

Regrowing damaged nerves hinges on shutting down key genes

Neurons in the brain and spinal cord don't grow back after injury, unlike those in the rest of the body. Cut your finger, and you'll probably be back to using it in days or weeks; slice through your spinal cord,… Continue Reading →

Humans may be reversing the climate clock, by 50 million years

Our future on Earth may also be our past. In a study published Monday (Dec. 10, 2018) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers show that humans are reversing a long-term cooling trend tracing back at least… Continue Reading →

‘Dropout’ rate for academic scientists has risen sharply in past 50 years, study finds

Half of the people pursuing careers as scientists at higher education institutions will drop out of the field after five years, according to a new analysis from researchers at Indiana University Bloomington. That number contrasts sharply with the departure rate… Continue Reading →

Water found on asteroid, confirming Bennu as excellent mission target

From August through early December, the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft aimed three of its science instruments toward Bennu and began making the mission's first observations of the asteroid. During this period, the spacecraft traveled the last 1.4 million miles (2.2 million km)… Continue Reading →

Smelling the forest not the trees: Why animals are better at sniffing complex smells

Animals are much better at smelling a complex "soup" of odorants rather than a single pure ingredient, a new study by the University of Sussex has revealed. Complex mixed odorants are detected more quickly and more reliably by olfactory receptors… Continue Reading →

Key cellular mechanism that triggers pneumonia in humans

The situation is relatively common, especially in winter. You come down with the flu, which lasts longer than usual. A few days later, you discover you have pneumonia. The relationship between influenza and pneumonia has long been observed by health… Continue Reading →

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