Agro∼News

information, news, fairs, conferences

Date

November 7, 2018

2018 NAFB Foundation Going Strong

The NAFB Foundation presented $25,000 in college scholarships to five outstanding students during the foundation luncheon on Wednesday at the 75th annual convention. The scholarship recipients, pictured here with NAFB Foundation president Sara Wyant, Agri-Pulse, are: Matthew Winterholler, Texas Tech… Continue Reading →

Tell Florida's Natural: Orange Juice with Roundup Weedkiller Isn't 'Natural'

Belong to campaign: Millions Against MonsantoThe Myth of NaturalCategory: Food Safety, Genetic EngineeringArea: USA When you buy food labeled “natural,” you probably assume it doesn’t contain “unnatural” ingredients—like agrochemicals known to cause cancer. But as we’ve found with some other… Continue Reading →

Pesticides Are in So Many Many Foods. Did You Know They May Also Be in Your Home?

By now, most everyone knows that the pesticides used by industrial farming operations pollute the air, linger in the soil and turn up on many foods—including Ben & Jerry’s ice cream. Now, a new study suggests those pesticides could also… Continue Reading →

Bugs Are Full of Our Drugs and They Could Be Getting Other Critters Hooked, Too

Wildlife that feed on bugs near streams are at a higher risk of being dosed with pharmaceuticals Insects near streams are taking in loads of pharmaceutical drugs and can pass the compounds on to predators higher in the food chain,… Continue Reading →

Breakfast Favorite Orange Juice Tainted by Glyphosate Herbicide Threatens Our Health and Florida's Environment

In August, news broke that Cheerios, Quaker Oats, and other breakfast cereals were contaminated with glyphosate weed killer. Just this week, more news of glyphosate in snack bars. Parents across the nation became concerned about their family’s breakfast foods and… Continue Reading →

The 2018 Midterms: Outcomes and Impacts on Sustainable Agriculture

Kentucky Farmer Will Bowling with NSAC staff on Capitol Hill. Photo credit: NSAC. With 435 House and 35 Senate races on the ballot yesterday, the 2018 midterms were closely watched across the nation – not least of all by advocates… Continue Reading →

2018 NAFB Social Media Corps

College students passionate about social media and digital storytelling are busy sharing 2018 NAFB Convention updates throughout the event on various social platforms, including Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. Farm Credit and Zoetis are sponsoring this year’s Social Media Corps, which… Continue Reading →

Codebreaker Turing’s theory explains how shark scales are patterned

A system proposed by world war two codebreaker Alan Turing more than 60 years ago can explain the patterning of tooth-like scales possessed by sharks, according to new research. Scientists from the University of Sheffield's Department of Animal and Plant… Continue Reading →

Could machines using artificial intelligence make doctors obsolete?

Artificial intelligence systems simulate human intelligence by learning, reasoning, and self correction. This technology has the potential to be more accurate than doctors at making diagnoses and performing surgical interventions, says Jörg Goldhahn, MD, MAS, deputy head of the Institute… Continue Reading →

Some factors have a greater impact on heart attack risk in women than they do in men

Overall, men are at greater risk of heart attack than women, but several studies have suggested that certain risk factors have more of an impact on the risk in women than in men. To look more closely at this association,… Continue Reading →

Patients with type 1 diabetes missing out on glucose devices

Tens of thousands of UK patients with type 1 diabetes are being denied the potential benefits of flash glucose monitoring devices because of a postcode lottery, an investigation by The BMJ has found. Abbott's Freestyle Libre is currently the only… Continue Reading →

Skin-like sensor maps blood-oxygen levels anywhere in the body

Injuries can't heal without a constant influx of blood's key ingredient — oxygen. A new flexible sensor developed by engineers at the University of California, Berkeley, can map blood-oxygen levels over large areas of skin, tissue and organs, potentially giving… Continue Reading →

Climate change causing more severe wildfires, larger insect outbreaks in temperate forests

A warmer, drier climate is expected is increase the likelihood of larger-scale forest disturbances such as wildfires, insect outbreaks, disease and drought, according to a new study co-authored by a Portland State University professor. The study, published Oct. 19 in… Continue Reading →

Batteryless smart devices closer to reality

Researchers at the University of Waterloo have taken a huge step towards making smart devices that do not use batteries or require charging. These battery-free objects, which feature an IP address for internet connectivity, are known as Internet of Things… Continue Reading →

Goffin’s cockatoos can create and manipulate novel tools

Goffin's cockatoos can tear cardboard into long strips as tools to reach food — but fail to adjust strip width to fit through narrow openings, according to a study published November 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by… Continue Reading →

Dry conditions may have helped a new type of plant gain a foothold on Earth

In the dramatically changing conditions of ancient Earth, organisms had to evolve new strategies to keep up. From the mid-Oligocene, roughly 30 million years ago, to the mid-to-late Miocene, about 5 million years ago, carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere… Continue Reading →

Novel antibiotic shows promise in treatment of uncomplicated gonorrhea

An investigational oral antibiotic called zoliflodacin was well-tolerated and successfully cured most cases of uncomplicated gonorrhea when tested in a Phase 2 multicenter clinical trial, according to findings published today in the New England Journal of Medicine. The National Institute… Continue Reading →

NAFB is 75 Years Strong

The 2018 National Association of Farm Broadcasting Convention is marking the diamond anniversary of the meeting, which has been held in Kansas City for about 45 of those 75 years. NAFB president Tom Cassidy, Ag Radio Network, says this year’s… Continue Reading →

Nuelle to Join Agri-Pulse

Ben Nuelle interviews Bill Northey at 2017 FPS After a year away from the microphone, Ben Nuelle is joining the Agri-Pulse editorial team in Washington, D.C., on Dec. 1, where he will write and broadcast for the company’s subscription-only newsletter… Continue Reading →

Grains Council Officers Meet in Mexico

U.S. Grains Council (USGC) officers headed south of the border last week to talk about the new trade agreement and meet with new government officials in the country that accounts for a big chunk of U.S. feed grains exports. Leaders… Continue Reading →

The teeth of Changchunsaurus: Rare insight into ornithopod dinosaur tooth evolution

The teeth of Changchunsaurus parvus, a small herbivorous dinosaur from the Cretaceous of China, represent an important and poorly-known stage in the evolution of ornithopod dentition, according to a study released November 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE… Continue Reading →

Quantitative 3D analysis of bone tools sheds light on ancient manufacture and use

Quantitative three-dimensional analysis of bone wear patterns can provide insight into the manufacture and use of early human tools, according to a study by Naomi Martisius of the University of California at Davis and colleagues, published November 7 in the… Continue Reading →

Saving wildlife: Using geology to track elusive hawks

Researchers at the University of Cincinnati are perfecting an innovative way to track the migration of elusive wildlife to help in their conservation. UC professor Brooke Crowley studies feathers plucked from hawks captured for leg-banding in Idaho. Cooper's hawks and… Continue Reading →

Levitating particles could lift nuclear detective work

Laser-based 'optical tweezers' could levitate uranium and plutonium particles, thus allowing the measurement of nuclear recoil during radioactive decay. This technique, proposed by scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory, provides a new method for conducting the radioactive particle analysis essential… Continue Reading →

When quantum particles swirl about, they still obey universal laws

Some things are so complicated that it is completely impossible to precisely calculate them. This includes large quantum systems, which consist of many particles, particularly when they are not in an equilibrium state, but changing rapidly. Such examples include the… Continue Reading →

Images of photosynthetic protein complex splitting water

In a new article published in Nature an international research team presents high-resolution images of photosystem II, the protein complex that splits water into hydrogen ions and oxygen during photosynthesis. The images will help researchers better understand this complex mechanism,… Continue Reading →

Machine-learning algorithm predicts how cells repair broken DNA

The human genome has its own proofreaders and editors, and their handiwork is not as haphazard as once thought. When DNA's double helix is broken after damage from, say, exposure to X-rays, molecular machines perform a kind of genetic "auto-correction"… Continue Reading →

Finding a rhyme and reason to CRISPR-Cas9’s mutations

Since the early days of CRISPR-Cas9, researchers have known that this gene editing technology is excellent for breaking things. With precision, these scissor-like tools can be sent to any location in the genome to make a snip and break a… Continue Reading →

Astronomers find pairs of black holes at the centers of merging galaxies

For the first time, a team of astronomers has observed several pairs of galaxies in the final stages of merging together into single, larger galaxies. Peering through thick walls of gas and dust surrounding the merging galaxies' messy cores, the… Continue Reading →

Tiny molecule has big effect in childhood brain tumor studies

Sometimes small things make the biggest differences. A new study by UT Health San Antonio researchers found that a molecule thousands of times smaller than a gene is able to kill medulloblastoma, the most common childhood brain cancer. This tiny… Continue Reading →

Low health literacy associated with early death for cardiovascular patients

Patients hospitalized with a cardiovascular event are more likely to die within one year if they have low health literacy, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study released today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. Health literacy is the ability to… Continue Reading →

Study shows how vultures evesdrop to gather vital flight information

A new study has revealed how vultures use their very own social networks to work out the best way to take advantage of thermal updrafts to help them fly vast distances. The research, carried out by a team from Swansea… Continue Reading →

Scientists theorize new origin story for Earth’s water

Earth's water may have originated from both asteroidal material and gas left over from the formation of the Sun, according to new research. The new finding could give scientists important insights about the development of other planets and their potential… Continue Reading →

How do babies laugh? Like chimps!

Few things can delight an adult more easily than the uninhibited, effervescent laughter of a baby. Yet baby laughter, a new study shows, differs from adult laughter in a key way: Babies laugh as they both exhale and inhale, in… Continue Reading →

Microbiome implicated in sea star wasting disease

The culprit might be many microbes. Since 2013, a gruesome and mysterious disease has killed millions of sea stars along the West Coast from Mexico to Alaska — making the animals turn to goo, lose their legs, and pull their… Continue Reading →

After a bad winter in the ocean, female Magellanic penguins suffer most, study shows

Every autumn in the Southern Hemisphere, Magellanic penguins leave their coastal nesting sites in South America. For adults, their summer task — breeding, or at least trying to — is complete. Newly fledged chicks and adults gradually head out to… Continue Reading →

Chlamydia attacks with Frankenstein protein

When Chlamydia trachomatis, the bacterium that causes one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide, infects a human cell, it hijacks parts of the host to build protective layers around itself. Inside this makeshift fortress, the bug grows and… Continue Reading →

‘Dual mobility’ hip replacement implant reduces risk of dislocation, study finds

Hip replacement surgery is highly successful in relieving pain, restoring mobility and improving quality of life. More than 330,000 procedures are performed each year in the United States, and that number is expected to almost double by the year 2030…. Continue Reading →

Tumour immune cells could aid cancer therapies, study shows

A pioneering technique designed to spot differences between immune cells in tumours could speed the development of cancer treatments, research suggests. Scientists say the approach could be used to help doctors choose the best treatments for individual patients and predict… Continue Reading →

New hope for world’s most endangered mammal

New genetic analysis of white rhino populations suggests it could be possible to rescue the critically endangered northern white rhinoceros from extinction, using the genes of its less threatened southern cousin. Analysing genetic samples from 232 rhinos, researchers from Cardiff… Continue Reading →

Precision Ag Bytes 11/7

CNH Industrial N.V. and Farmers Edge announced that they have entered into a strategic digital agriculture agreement that will make available a portfolio of connectivity and agronomic solutions to Case IH and New Holland customers. Through this agreement, Case IH… Continue Reading →

Bacteria use different strategies to divide and survive under stress

Under laboratory conditions, many common bacteria reproduce and divide into symmetrical halves. In the real world with limited resources, however, conditions aren't always ideal for this kind of carefully planned growth. A new study by scientists from the University of… Continue Reading →

Secrets of engineered protein receptor, CAR

Cancer remains the second-leading cause of death in the United States. This year, an estimated 1.7 million new cases will be diagnosed, with nearly 610,000 people expected to die from the disease, according to the National Cancer Institute. Fortunately, several… Continue Reading →

Singing may reduce stress, improve motor function for people with Parkinson’s disease

Singing may provide benefits beyond improving respiratory and swallow control in people with Parkinson's disease, according to new data from Iowa State University researchers. The results from the pilot study revealed improvements in mood and motor symptoms, as well as… Continue Reading →

Ultrasound releases drug to alter activity in targeted brain areas in rats

Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have developed a noninvasive way of delivering drugs to within a few millimeters of a desired point in the brain. The method, tested in rats, uses focused ultrasound to jiggle drug molecules loose from… Continue Reading →

Autonomous vehicles could shape the future of urban tourism

In the first study of its kind, published in the Annals of Tourism Research, academics from the University of Surrey and the University of Oxford have examined how Autonomous Vehicles (AVs) may have a substantial impact on the future of… Continue Reading →

Clinical and environmental factors impact absorption of common sunscreen ingredient

With the growing awareness of ultraviolet (UV) exposure resulting in an increased risk of photoaging and skin cancers, consumers are using higher sun protection factor (SPF) sunscreens with frequent reapplication. New research, Evaluation of Reapplication and Controlled Heat Exposure on… Continue Reading →

Artificial sensor mimics human sense of touch

A team of researchers have developed an artificial tactile sensor that mimics the ability of human skin to detect surface information, such as shapes, patterns and structures. This may be one step closer to making electronic devices and robots that… Continue Reading →

A molecular switch links a Scottish mouse, a Finnish patient and Parkinson’s disease

An international team of scientists led by the University of Dundee, UK have verified that a molecular pathway that has been studied for years under laboratory conditions, is also disrupted in Parkinson's disease patients. Parkinson's disease is a relentless neurodegenerative… Continue Reading →

Protecting adult female north atlantic right whales from injury and death key to recovery

Why is the endangered western North Atlantic right whale population growing far more slowly than those of southern right whales, a sister species also recovering from near extinction by commercial whaling? NOAA Fisheries researchers and colleagues looked more closely at… Continue Reading →

An overlooked giant: Useful and abundant, African ‘Zam’ palm newly described for science

Common sight along road sides in south Cameroon and western Gabon, and growing in hard-to-be-missed dense colonies, it remains a mystery how this locally useful new palm species Raphia zamiana (locally known as "Zam") has been missed by botanists until… Continue Reading →

Far fewer lakes below the East Antarctic Ice Sheet than previously believed

AWI researchers recently assessed subglacial lakes detected by satellite, and found very little water. But if that's the case, what is the source of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet's massive ice streams? In the course of an extensive Antarctic expedition,… Continue Reading →

Interdisciplinary interactions inspire new discovery

Researchers in Japan have found new good catalysts using unique "Heusler" alloys, following an interdisciplinary approach. Most studies on catalysts have been conducted by researchers in chemistry. However, catalysts also relate to other research fields. For example, materials science including… Continue Reading →

Graphene takes a step towards renewable fuel

Researchers at Linköping University, Sweden, are working to develop a method to convert water and carbon dioxide to the renewable energy of the future, using the energy from the sun and graphene applied to the surface of cubic silicon carbide…. Continue Reading →

Powered by windows: Enhanced power factor in transparent thermoelectric nanowire materials

A research group led by Professor Yoshiaki Nakamura of Osaka University successfully developed a methodology for enhancing thermoelectric power factor while decreasing thermal conductivity. By introducing ZnO nanowires into ZnO films, the thermoelectric power factor became 3 times larger than… Continue Reading →

Preventing heart disease in cancer survivors

A new study by Washington State University researchers suggests that a protein called CDK2 plays a critical role in heart damage caused by doxorubicin, a commonly used chemotherapy drug. Using a rodent model, the researchers showed that doxorubicin increases CDK2… Continue Reading →

Bullying ‘follows’ LGB people from school to work

Around one in three lesbian, gay and bisexual individuals who are bullied at school will have similar experiences in the workplace later in life, according to new research by Anglia Ruskin University. The study, published in the Manchester School journal,… Continue Reading →

Discovery: Rare three-species hybrid warbler

Scientists have shown that a bird found in Pennsylvania is the offspring of a hybrid warbler mother and a warbler father from an entirely different genus — a combination never recorded before now and which resulted in a three-species hybrid… Continue Reading →

Promising new targeted therapy for acceleration of bone fracture repair

There are over six million fractures per year in the U.S. with direct costs in the billions, not to mention lost productivity. The only drug currently available to accelerate the healing process must be applied directly onto the fracture surface… Continue Reading →

Hunt for interesting metabolites with the antiSMASH database

The antiSMASH tool can help researchers find bacterial genes responsible for the biosynthesis of interesting metabolites such as new antibiotics, pesticides, and anti-cancer drugs. A new database that collects results from the antiSMASH tool eases the comparison of thousands of… Continue Reading →

There’s real skill in fantasy sports

If you've ever taken part in the armchair sport of fantasy football and found yourself at the top of your league's standings at the end of the season, a new MIT study suggests your performance — however far removed from… Continue Reading →

Financial giants can have a pivotal role for climate stability

Financial institutions, such as banks and pension funds, have a key role to play in efforts to avoid dangerous climate change. And it is not only about redirecting investments to renewable energy and low-carbon businesses, but also to bolster the… Continue Reading →

Modern slavery promotes overfishing

Labour abuses, including modern slavery, are 'hidden subsidies' that allow distant-water fishing fleets to remain profitable and promote overfishing, new research from the University of Western Australia and the Sea Around Us initiative at the University of British Columbia has… Continue Reading →

New analysis about synchronization transitions improves knowledge of physical, biological systems

In physical, biological and technological systems, the time that a system's components take to influence each other can affect the transition to synchronization, an important finding that improves understanding of how these systems function, according to a study led by… Continue Reading →

Genetic study clarifies the causes of the most severe heart muscle diseases of children

Cardiac muscle degeneration (cardiomyopathy) is the most common cause of severe cardiac dysfunction and life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias in children. These severe disorders often lead to consideration of heart transplant. However, their actual cause — the genetic basis — has been… Continue Reading →

Machine-learning system could aid critical decisions in sepsis care

Researchers from MIT and Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have developed a predictive model that could guide clinicians in deciding when to give potentially life-saving drugs to patients being treated for sepsis in the emergency room. Sepsis is one of the… Continue Reading →

New prosthetic hand system allows user to ‘feel’ again

Arizona State University researcher James Abbas is part of a multi-institutional research team that has developed a new prosthetic hand system with a fully implanted, wirelessly controlled neurostimulator that has restored "feeling" to a person with a hand amputation. The… Continue Reading →

Doing the wave: How stretchy fluids react to wavy surfaces

Viscoelastic fluids are everywhere, whether racing through your veins or through 1,300 kilometers of pipe in the Trans-Alaska Pipeline. Unlike Newtonian fluids, such as oil or water, viscoelastic fluids stretch like a sticky strand of saliva. Chains of molecules inside… Continue Reading →

Dine with Andrew Zimmern, Ruth Reichl, Kat Kinsman, Marion Nestle, and Nik Sharma to Benefit Civil Eats

Back by popular demand, Civil Eats will host its third annual Celebration on Tuesday, November 13 in San Francisco at The Pearl. This is the one time each year that we gather to raise critical funds for our work and… Continue Reading →

Workers Fear Injury as Administration Clears Way for Faster Chicken Slaughter

Late last month, the Trump administration cleared the way for chicken plants to increase their processing line speeds from 140 birds per minute to 175 birds per minute. The change deals a blow to workers and reverses the efforts of… Continue Reading →

Mutant protein tackles DNA guardian to promote cancer development

Melbourne scientists have discovered how tumour development is driven by mutations in the most important gene in preventing cancer, p53. The research revealed that in the early stages of cancer, mutant p53 'tackles' the normal p53 protein and blocks it… Continue Reading →

Compound derived from marijuana may benefit children with epilepsy

In recent years, cannabinoids — the active chemicals in medical marijuana — have been increasingly touted as a potential treatment for a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. In a Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology review, investigators compare their efficacy… Continue Reading →

Filtering liquids with liquids saves electricity

Filtering and treating water, both for human consumption and to clean industrial and municipal wastewater, accounts for about 13% of all electricity consumed in the US every year and releases about 290 million metric tons of CO2 into the atmosphere… Continue Reading →

Does a woman’s weight gain during pregnancy affect children’s bone health?

A new study has examined whether managing weight during pregnancy might affect children's bone mass. In the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research study, investigators analyzed prospective data from 2,167 mother-child pairs from Portugal. In under/normal weight mothers, weight gain… Continue Reading →

Study explores timing of muscle-related problems of statin use

Statins have been linked with muscle pain and other musculoskeletal adverse events (MAEs) in some patients. A new Pharmacology Research & Perspectives study has examined the timing of MAEs that develop during statin therapy and determined whether concomitant drugs used… Continue Reading →

World’s most comprehensive digital roadmap to unlock male infertility

Millions of couples who have trouble conceiving may get relief from new research led by scientists at The University of Texas at San Antonio. The researchers have developed a high-resolution genetic map showing how men produce sperm cells. Their effort… Continue Reading →

Can social media lead to labor market discrimination?

A new Journal of Economics & Management Strategy study investigates whether social media may be used as a source of information for recruiters to discriminate against job applicants. For the study, researchers set up an experiment that involved sending more… Continue Reading →

Ultra-hot gas around remnants of sun-like stars

Solving a decades-old mystery, an international team of astronomers have discovered an extremely hot magnetosphere around a white dwarf, a remnant of a star like our Sun. The work was led by Dr Nicole Reindl, Research Fellow of the Royal… Continue Reading →

Some Breakfast Foods Contain More Glyphosate Than Vitamin D or B12

Concerns over the health effects of glyphosate — the active ingredient in Roundup and other weed killer formulations — continue to rise as evidence of harm and widespread exposure keeps accumulating. In recent years, researchers have discovered it may affect… Continue Reading →

Ozone Layer Finally Healing After Damage Caused by Aerosols, UN Says

Upper layer above northern hemisphere should be completely repaired in 2030s The ozone layer is showing signs of continuing recovery from man-made damage and is likely to heal fully by 2060, new evidence shows. The measures taken to repair the… Continue Reading →

Study: GMO's Lacking in Protein and Nutrients

Traditional corn has 28% more protein than the average GMO food/feed corn in our study, meaning you have to eat 28% more on average to get the same nutrition. Modern GMO food is full of empty carbs and calories, but… Continue Reading →

Another Class of Pesticides Is Destroying Brains

While there are many sources of exposure to toxic chemicals, the use of organophosphates (OPs) is making news once again for the damage it causes to children's brains. A group of environmental and public health researchers from the U.S. and… Continue Reading →

© 2018 Agro-News.org

information, news, fairs, conferences