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Date

November 14, 2018

Climate change likely caused migration, demise of ancient Indus Valley civilization

More than 4,000 years ago, the Harappa culture thrived in the Indus River Valley of what is now modern Pakistan and northwestern India, where they built sophisticated cities, invented sewage systems that predated ancient Rome's, and engaged in long-distance trade… Continue Reading →

Drug combination makes cancer disappear in mice with neuroblastoma

Researchers investigating new treatments for neuroblastoma — one of the most common childhood cancers — have found that a combination of two drugs made tumours disappear in mice, making it more effective than any other drugs tested in these animals…. Continue Reading →

Breakthrough in treatment of restless legs syndrome

New research published in the Journal of Physiology presents a breakthrough in the treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS). RLS is a common condition of the nervous system that causes an overwhelming irresistible urge to move the legs. Patients complain… Continue Reading →

Introducing USFRA 2.0

In Kansas City last week, the U.S. Farmers and Ranchers Alliance (USFRA) introduced its refined focus, the new Farmer Ambassador network, and 2019 projects that connect food and agriculture stakeholders to enable better decision making. Speaking to affiliate members and… Continue Reading →

GROWMARK Simulator Aids Training

Using a sprayer simulator for training is not new to members of GROWMARK and FS System companies, but a virtual reality (VR) component is a recent addition. “It’s helped out our training quite a bit because you can move around… Continue Reading →

ASTA Talks Seed and Trade at #NAFB18

The American Seed Trade Association (ASTA) team attended the NAFB Trade Talk last week and discussed what their name is all about – seed and trade. ASTA CEO Andy LaVigne says trade is critical for the seed industry and acceptance… Continue Reading →

A world without brick-and-mortar stores? Even avid online shoppers say, ‘no, thanks’

It has been dubbed the "retail apocalypse" — the widespread shuttering of brick-and-mortar stores across America in the wake of online shopping's skyrocketing popularity. But how do consumers feel about this changing retail landscape? University of Arizona researcher Sabrina Helm… Continue Reading →

Microgel powder fights infection and helps wounds heal

While making smart glue, a team of engineers discovered a handy byproduct: hydrogen peroxide. In microgel form, it reduces bacteria and virus ability to infect by at least 99 percent. Hao Meng's doctoral project focused on biocompatibility testing and pulling… Continue Reading →

Natural solutions can reduce global warming

Restoring the United States' lands and coastal wetlands could have a much bigger role in reducing global warming than previously thought, according to the most comprehensive national assessment to date of how greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced and stored… Continue Reading →

Massive impact crater from a kilometer-wide iron meteorite discovered in Greenland

An international team lead by researchers from the Centre for GeoGenetics at the Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen have discovered a 31-km wide meteorite impact crater buried beneath the ice-sheet in the northern Greenland. This is the… Continue Reading →

Late Miocene ape maxilla (upper jaw) discovered in western India

An ape maxilla (upper jaw) from the Late Miocene found in the Kutch basin, in western India, significantly extends the southern range of ancient apes in the Indian Peninsula, according to a study published in November 14, 2018 in the… Continue Reading →

How we use music as a possible sleep aid

Many individuals use music in the hope that it fights sleep difficulties, according to a study published November 14 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tabitha Trahan of the University of Sheffield, UK, and colleagues. As described by the… Continue Reading →

Parents shouldn’t worry if their infant doesn’t sleep through the night by a year old

New parents often expect their baby to start sleeping through the night by around six months of age. Indeed, they often receive messages from paediatricians and others about the importance of early sleep consolidation. But authors of a study in… Continue Reading →

Symbiosis a driver of truffle diversity

While the sight of black or white truffle being shaved over on pasta is generally considered a sign of dining extravagance, they play an important role in soil ecosystem services. Truffles are the fruiting bodies of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal… Continue Reading →

For arid, Mars-like Peruvian desert, rain brings death

When rains fell on the arid Atacama Desert, it was reasonable to expect floral blooms to follow. Instead, the water brought death. An international team of planetary astrobiologists has found that after encountering never-before-seen rainfall three years ago at the… Continue Reading →

Deep-time evolution of animal life on islands

Islands have been vital laboratories for advancing evolutionary theory since the pioneering work of Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace in the 19th century. Now, a new paper appearing in PLOS ONE from an international team of investigators describes two… Continue Reading →

First tally of US-Russia polar bears finds a healthy population

Not all polar bears are in the same dire situation due to retreating sea ice, at least not right now. Off the western coast of Alaska, the Chukchi Sea is rich in marine life, but the number of polar bears… Continue Reading →

Competition for shrinking groundwater

Groundwater, which has been used to irrigate crops, satiate livestock and quench thirst in general for thousands of years, continues to be a vital resource around the world. But according to research by Scott Jasechko and Debra Perrone, assistant professors… Continue Reading →

Alcohol ads with pro-drinking comments on Facebook boost desire to drink, study finds

Alcohol advertisements on social media sites such as Facebook can increase young adults' desire to drink if the ads contain pro-drinking comments from users. That's according to new research in the current issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol… Continue Reading →

Cold Super-Earth found orbiting closest single star to Sun

A planet has been detected orbiting Barnard's Star , a mere 6 light-years away. This breakthrough — announced in a paper published today in the journal Nature — is a result of the Red Dots and CARMENES projects, whose search… Continue Reading →

Researchers discover novel ‘to divide or to differentiate’ switch in plants

Scientists from VIB and Ghent University under the guidance of Prof. Dr. Jenny Russinova uncovered a novel mechanism in plants that controls an important decision step in stomatal lineage to divide asymmetrically or to differentiate. This is a decisive step… Continue Reading →

Tropical trees in the Andes are moving up — toward extinction

An international study led by University of Miami tropical biologists reveals that tropical trees are migrating upslope to escape climate change, but not fast enough. In the most comprehensive study of its kind, an international team of scientists led by… Continue Reading →

Climate simulations project wetter, windier hurricanes

New supercomputer simulations by climate scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have shown that climate change intensified the amount of rainfall in recent hurricanes such as Katrina, Irma, and Maria by 5 to 10… Continue Reading →

Large areas of the Brazilian rainforest at risk of losing protection

Up to 15 million hectares of the Brazilian Amazon is at risk of losing its legal protection, according to a new study from researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, and the University of… Continue Reading →

Seismic study reveals huge amount of water dragged into Earth’s interior

Slow-motion collisions of tectonic plates under the ocean drag about three times more water down into the deep Earth than previously estimated, according to a first-of-its-kind seismic study that spans the Mariana Trench. The observations from the deepest ocean trench… Continue Reading →

Recommending plants to benefit and attract pollinators

A survey was conducted by the University of Nebraska to unveil the extent to which horticultural employees are knowledgeable about pollinators. Carter Westerhold, Samuel Wortman, Kim Todd, and Douglas Golick sought to determine what plant and management recommendations these employees… Continue Reading →

A new approach to detecting cancer earlier from blood tests

Cancer scientists led by principal investigator Dr. Daniel De Carvalho at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have combined "liquid biopsy," epigenetic alterations and machine learning to develop a blood test to detect and classify cancer at its earliest stages. The findings,… Continue Reading →

Houston’s urban sprawl increased rainfall, flooding during Hurricane Harvey

Houston's urban landscape directly contributed to the torrential rainfall and deadly flooding experienced during Hurricane Harvey in August 2017, according to Princeton and University of Iowa researchers. The researchers report in the journal Nature Nov. 15 that Houston's risk for… Continue Reading →

Putting food-safety detection in the hands of consumers

MIT Media Lab researchers have developed a wireless system that leverages the cheap RFID tags already on hundreds of billions of products to sense potential food contamination — with no hardware modifications needed. With the simple, scalable system, the researchers… Continue Reading →

Precision Ag Bytes 11/14

The Weed Science Society of America and its affiliated scientific societies have scheduled information-packed annual meetings over the coming months. Registration details for this year’s annual meeting of the Canadian Weed Science Society are available at www.weedscience.ca. Registration details for… Continue Reading →

Mothers infected by dengue may have babies with higher risk of severe Zika, and vice versa

Two new studies provide evidence that previous Dengue infection in pregnant mothers may lead to increased severity of Zika in babies, and that previous Zika infection in mice mothers may increase severity of Dengue infection in their pups. The research,… Continue Reading →

Bias-based bullying does more harm, is harder to protect against

A new study finds that bias-based bullying does more harm to students than generalized bullying, particularly for students who are targeted because of multiple identities, such as race and gender. What's more, the study finds that efforts to mitigate these… Continue Reading →

Climate control of Earth’s critical zone

We know less about the ground beneath our feet than we do about the surface of Mars, but new research by University of Colorado Boulder geoscientists shines a light on this hidden world from ridgetops to valley floors and shows… Continue Reading →

How exercise could help fight drug addiction

The siren call of addictive drugs can be hard to resist, and returning to the environment where drugs were previously taken can make resistance that much harder. However, addicts who exercise appear to be less vulnerable to the impact of… Continue Reading →

Rainforest vine compound starves pancreatic cancer cells

Pancreatic cancer cells are known for their ability to thrive under extreme conditions of low nutrients and oxygen, a trait known in the cancer field as "austerity." The cells' remarkable resistance to starvation is one reason why pancreatic cancer is… Continue Reading →

Older adults’ abstract reasoning ability predicts depressive symptoms over time

Age-related declines in abstract reasoning ability predict increasing depressive symptoms in subsequent years, according to data from a longitudinal study of older adults in Scotland. The research is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science…. Continue Reading →

Epoxy compound gets a graphene bump

Rice University scientists have built a better epoxy for electronic applications. Epoxy combined with "ultrastiff" graphene foam invented in the Rice lab of chemist James Tour is substantially tougher than pure epoxy and far more conductive than other epoxy composites… Continue Reading →

Middle Eastern desert dust on the Tibetan plateau could affect the Indian summer monsoon

More than a century ago, British meteorologist Henry Blanford noted a connection between springtime snow cover on the Tibetan Plateau and Himalaya mountain range and the intensity of the summer monsoon season in India. Hundreds of studies have supported this… Continue Reading →

Soil’s history: A solution to soluble phosphorus?

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that around 45 million tons of phosphorus fertilizers will be used around the world in 2018. Much will be applied to soils that also received phosphorus fertilizers in past years…. Continue Reading →

Gravitational waves from a merged hyper-massive neutron star

For the first time astronomers have detected gravitational waves from a merged, hyper-massive neutron star. The scientists, Maurice van Putten of Sejong University in South Korea, and Massimo della Valle of the Osservatorio Astronomico de Capodimonte in Italy, publish their… Continue Reading →

Quantum science turns social

Researchers developed a versatile remote gaming interface that allowed external experts as well as hundreds of citizen scientists all over the world through multiplayer collaboration and in real time to optimize a quantum gas experiment in a lab at Aarhus… Continue Reading →

Salmon are shrinking and it shows in their genes

Male salmon are maturing earlier and becoming smaller, and it shows in their genes. This was the discovery of a study that examined scale samples from salmon in the River Teno in Northern Finland over a 40-year period, and looked… Continue Reading →

Diabetic foot ulcers heal quickly with nitric oxide technology

Diabetic foot ulcers can take up to 150 days to heal. A biomedical engineering team wants to reduce it to 21 days. They're planning to drop the healing time by amplifying what the body already does naturally: build layers of… Continue Reading →

Next step on the path towards an efficient biofuel cell

Fuel cells that work with the enzyme hydrogenase are, in principle, just as efficient as those that contain the expensive precious metal platinum as a catalyst. However, the enzymes need an aqueous environment, which makes it difficult for the starting… Continue Reading →

Earth’s magnetic field measured using artificial stars at 90 kilometers altitude

The mesosphere, at heights between 85 and 100 kilometers above the Earth's surface, contains a layer of atomic sodium. Astronomers use laser beams to create artificial stars, or laser guide stars (LGS), in this layer for improving the quality of… Continue Reading →

When electric fields make spins swirl

We are reaching the limits of silicon capabilities in terms of data storage density and speed of memory devices. One of the potential next-generation data storage elements is the magnetic skyrmion. A team at the Center for Correlated Electron Systems,… Continue Reading →

Nanotubes built from protein crystals: Breakthrough in biomolecular engineering

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have succeeded in constructing protein nanotubes from tiny scaffolds made by cross-linking of engineered protein crystals. The achievement could accelerate the development of artificial enzymes, nano-sized carriers and delivery systems for a… Continue Reading →

Checking very preterm babies’ head size can help identify long-term IQ problems

Regular measurements of head circumference of very preterm and full-term babies from an early age add valuable information when screening for long-term neurocognitive risk according to researchers from the University of Warwick and University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Very Preterm (VP)… Continue Reading →

Scientists engineer a functional optical lens out of 2D materials

In optics, the era of glass lenses may be waning. In recent years, physicists and engineers have been designing, constructing and testing different types of ultrathin materials that could replace the thick glass lenses used today in cameras and imaging… Continue Reading →

The Organic Food Industry Forges Its Own Path to Expand Growth

Should organic farmers and processors pool their money to create their own “checkoff” program used for industry-wide research and marketing much like other food industries do? (Think: “Got Milk?” or “Pork: The Other White Meat” and “Beef: Its What’s for… Continue Reading →

Venom shape untangles scorpion family tree

As a child growing up in Mexico, Carlos Santibanez-Lopez feared the scorpions that would often decorate the walls and ceilings of his home in search of a warm place with plenty of food. So when a college project sent him… Continue Reading →

Colder, darker climates increase alcohol consumption and liver disease

Where you live could influence how much you drink. According to new research from the University of Pittsburgh Division of Gastroenterology, people living in colder regions with less sunlight drink more alcohol than their warm-weather counterparts. The study, recently published… Continue Reading →

Farmed Fish Are Depleting Oceans of Wild Fish

It's estimated that within the next 10 years, farm-raised fish will make up the majority of fish consumed by humans. There are already 100 species being farmed,1 and while aquaculture, as it's technically known, may sound like a sustainable alternative… Continue Reading →

GMO Potatoes Are Here – How to Avoid Them

The genetically modified Innate potato was approved by the USDA in 2014. The “Innate” potato is a group of potato varieties that have had the same genetic alterations applied using a new form of genetic engineering known as RNA interference… Continue Reading →

Time for a Climate Resilient Farm Bill

It is time for farmers and policy makers to jointly create a legislation that provides both for the survival of the planet and allows them to survive financially with ongoing taxpayer funding. There is no other sane option. At the… Continue Reading →

Urging House Democrats to Go Bold on Climate, Group Says Probing Fossil Fuel Giants Must Be a 'Top Priority'

"The science is clear: we need climate solutions now, and we don't have a moment to lose," 350.org declared in a new petition After Democratic leaders signaled in the lead-up to last week's midterms that they have no plans to… Continue Reading →

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