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Date

November 15, 2018

35+ Natural & DIY Christmas Gifts Ideas

This year, we’ve decided to keep things simple, natural and sustainable with homemade, natural and DIY Christmas Gift Ideas (and a few select wooden toys for the kids that will (hopefully) last for generations). We are also trying to focus… Continue Reading →

What's Behind the CDC Claiming 80,000 Died from Flu Last Winter?

According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the 2017-2018 flu season was the deadliest flu season in the U.S. in four decades, hospitalizing 900,000 and killing 80,000, including 180 children. According to CNN,1 " … [F]lu-related… Continue Reading →

SA Government Rejects Monsanto's Triple Stacked GM Drought Tolerant Maize

The African Centre for Biodiversity (ACB) welcomes the decision of the South African biosafety authorities, rejecting Monsanto’s application for the commercial release of its GM drought tolerant triple stacked maize: MON 87460 x MON 89034 x NK 603. At its… Continue Reading →

NAFB Foundation Silent Auction Microphone Winner

To support the NAFB Foundation our AgNewsWire service donated a microphone that the winner could have painted in their own custom colors. Congratulations to Susan Littlefield, Rural Radio Network, for the winning bid in the Foundation Silent Auction during the… Continue Reading →

Engineered DNA-encoded PCSK9 inhibitors may provide an effective alternative for treating high cholesterol

Researchers at The Wistar Institute have developed novel synthetic DNA-encoded monoclonal antibodies (DMAbs) directed against PCSK9, a protein key to regulating cholesterol levels in the bloodstream. Results of preclinical studies showed a significant cholesterol decrease, opening the door for further… Continue Reading →

Drop your weapons!

Animal weapons such as antlers, tusks and limbs specialized for fighting require a large energy expenditure to produce and may cost even more to maintain. Because the leaf-footed bug sheds its large hind limbs, used as weapons in male-male battles,… Continue Reading →

Climate, life and the movement of continents: New connections

A new study by The University of Texas at Austin has demonstrated a possible link between life on Earth and the movement of continents. The findings show that sediment, which is often comprised from pieces of dead organisms, could play… Continue Reading →

Animal populations are shrinking due to their high-risk food-finding strategies

A study using animal-attached technology to measure food consumption in four very different wild vertebrates has revealed that animals using a high-risk strategy to find rarer food are particularly susceptible to becoming extinct, as they fail to gather food for… Continue Reading →

Farm Bureau Thanksgiving Dinner Survey

For the 33rd year in a row the American Farm Bureau Federation has released its survey of prices for food items on the traditional Thanksgiving Day dinner table, and the average cost of this year’s feast for 10 is $48.90,… Continue Reading →

What Turkey Producers Don't Want You to Know

As Turkey Day approaches, animal lovers cringe, food safety advocates become vigilant and industrial turkey producers hope you aren’t reading the news. Specifically, the purveyors of factory farm turkeys hope you haven’t heard about the latest turkey salmonella outbreak in… Continue Reading →

Metallic nanoparticles light up another path towards eco-friendly catalysts

Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology produced subnano-sized metallic particles that are very effective as catalysts for the oxidation of hydrocarbons. These catalysts can be as much as 50 times more effective than well-known Au-Pd bimetallic nanocatalysts. The oxidation of… Continue Reading →

‘Smart skin’ simplifies spotting strain in structures

Thanks to one peculiar characteristic of carbon nanotubes, engineers will soon be able to measure the accumulated strain in an airplane, a bridge or a pipeline — or just about anything — over the entire surface or down to microscopic… Continue Reading →

Omega-3 fatty acids reduce the risk of premature birth

A new Cochrane Review published today has found that increasing the intake of omega-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) during pregnancy reduces the risk of premature births. Premature birth is the leading cause of death for children under 5 years… Continue Reading →

FMC Introduces Ethos 3D

Participants at the 2018 National Association of Farm Broadcasting Trade Talk event learned more about Ethos® 3D insecticide/fungicide from FMC. The product is formulated specifically for the 3RIVE 3D® in-furrow application system that converts traditional high-volume applications to low-volume applications… Continue Reading →

Seeing and smelling food prepares the mouse liver for digestion

The sight or smell of something delicious is often enough to get your mouth watering, but the physiological response to food perception may go well beyond your salivary glands. New research in mice shows that the sight and smell of… Continue Reading →

To monitor ‘social jet lag,’ scientists look to Twitter

Social jet lag — a syndrome related to the mismatch between the body's internal clock and the realities of our daily schedules — has previously been tied to health problems. Now, researchers reporting in Current Biology on November 15 have… Continue Reading →

Gut hormone and brown fat interact to tell the brain it’s time to stop eating

Researchers from Germany and Finland have shown that so-called "brown fat" interacts with the gut hormone secretin in mice to relay nutritional signals about fullness to the brain during a meal. The study, appearing November 15 in the journal Cell,… Continue Reading →

Human activity may influence the distribution and transmission of Bartonella bacteria

Bartonella bacteria are disease-causing, blood-borne pathogens found in various mammal species. A study in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases by Hannah Frank and colleagues at Stanford University, California suggests that humans play an important role in disease risk, infection patterns, and… Continue Reading →

HIV latency differs across tissues in the body

Mechanisms that govern HIV transcription and latency differ in the gut and blood, according to a study published November 15 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Steven Yukl of San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of… Continue Reading →

DICE: Immune cell atlas goes live

Compare any two people's DNA and you will find millions of points where their genetic codes differ. Now, scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) are sharing a trove of data that will be critical for deciphering how this… Continue Reading →

Brain, muscle cells found lurking in kidney organoids grown in lab

Scientists hoping to develop better treatments for kidney disease have turned their attention to growing clusters of kidney cells in the lab. One day, so-called organoids — grown from human stem cells — may help repair damaged kidneys in people… Continue Reading →

How electric fish got their big brains

Helmet-heads of the freshwater fish world, African mormyrid fishes are known for having a brain-to-body size ratio that is similar to humans. But there's actually a great deal of variation in the size of mormyrid brains. These differences provide an… Continue Reading →

Dietary fat is good? Dietary fat is bad? Coming to consensus

Which is better, a low-fat/high-carbohydrate diet or a high-fat/low-carbohydrate diet — or is it the type of fat that matters? In a new paper featured on the cover of Science magazine's special issue on nutrition, researchers from Harvard T.H. Chan… Continue Reading →

New ‘SLICE’ tool can massively expand immune system’s cancer-fighting repertoire

Immunotherapy can cure some cancers that until fairly recently were considered fatal. In addition to developing drugs that boost the immune system's cancer-fighting abilities, scientists are becoming expert at manipulating a patient's own immune cells, turning them into cancer-killing armies…. Continue Reading →

A bigger nose, a bigger bang: Size matters for ecoholocating toothed whales

Trying to find your lunch in the dark using a narrow flashlight to illuminate one place at a time may not seem like the most efficient way of foraging. However, if you replace light with sound, this seems to be… Continue Reading →

Mysterious family of proteins are cellular pressure sensors

Scientists at Scripps Research have discovered that a mysterious family of cellular proteins called OSCAs and TMEM63s are a novel class of mechanosensitive ion channels. Mechanosensitive ion channels convert biologically relevant physical forces into biochemical signals. For example, a plant's… Continue Reading →

Stress of stretching solids: 3D image shows how particles distribute in metals

From the pots and pans on the stove to the wires suspending bridges, metal composites need to account for a variety of strength, malleability, and durability to meet human need. Now, researchers from the Nagoya Institute of Technology (NITech) in… Continue Reading →

New inflammation inhibitor discovered

A multidisciplinary team of researchers led from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden have developed an anti-inflammatory drug molecule with a new mechanism of action. By inhibiting a certain protein, the researchers were able to reduce the signals that trigger an inflammation…. Continue Reading →

Climate change/biodiversity loss: Inseparable threats to humanity that must be addressed together

Demand for bioenergy to reduce CO2 emissions from fossil fuels could cause a 10- to 30-fold increase in green energy-related land use in years to come, adding crushing pressure on habitat for plants and animals and undermining the essential diversity… Continue Reading →

Making moves and memories, are they connected?

It is known that certain areas of the brain are responsible for certain functions of the body. The cerebellum, a structure found in the back of the skull, is known to be important for the control of movement, while the… Continue Reading →

Ulcers from diabetes? New shoe insole could provide healing on-the-go

Diabetes can lead to ulcers that patients don't even feel or notice until the sight of blood. And because ulcers can't heal on their own, 14 to 24 percent of diabetics in the U.S. who experience them end up losing… Continue Reading →

Bursting bubbles launch bacteria from water to air

Wherever there's water, there's bound to be bubbles floating at the surface. From standing puddles, lakes, and streams, to swimming pools, hot tubs, public fountains, and toilets, bubbles are ubiquitous, indoors and out. A new MIT study shows how bubbles… Continue Reading →

Astronomers find possible elusive star behind supernova

Astronomers may have finally uncovered the long-sought progenitor to a specific type of exploding star by sifting through NASA Hubble Space Telescope archival data. The supernova, called a Type Ic, is thought to detonate after its massive star has shed… Continue Reading →

Astronomers detect once-in-a-lifetime gamma rays

Scientists have discovered something amazing. In a cluster of some of the most massive and luminous stars in our galaxy, about 5,000 light years from Earth, astronomers detected particles being accelerated by a rapidly rotating neutron star as it passed… Continue Reading →

First-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection" — the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion — in the Earth's magnetotail, the… Continue Reading →

Arming drug hunters, chemists design new reaction for drug discovery

If pharmaceutical chemists are the drug hunters who discover new medicines, scientists like Andrew McNally and Robert Paton are the armorers — the deft creators who arm drug hunters with the sharpest tools. The pair of Colorado State University organic… Continue Reading →

Solar panels for yeast cell biofactories

Genetically engineered microbes such as bacteria and yeasts have long been used as living factories to produce drugs and fine chemicals. More recently, researchers have started to combine bacteria with semiconductor technology that, similar to solar panels on the roof… Continue Reading →

Nanofiber carpet could lead to new sticky or insulating surfaces

Inspired by the extraordinary characteristics of polar bear fur, lotus leaves and gecko feet, engineering researchers have developed a new way to make arrays of nanofibers that could bring us coatings that are sticky, repellent, insulating or light emitting, among… Continue Reading →

Warning: Chemical weapons risk during a period of very rapid scientific change

Alarming examples of the dangers from chemical weapons have been seen recently in the use of industrial chemicals and the nerve agent sarin against civilians in Syria, and in the targeted assassination operations using VX nerve agent in Malaysia and… Continue Reading →

Trans-galactic streamers feeding most luminous galaxy in the universe

The most luminous galaxy in the universe has been caught in the act of stripping away nearly half the mass from at least three of its smaller neighbors, according to a new study published in the journal Science. The light… Continue Reading →

Corn Growers Partner With Environmental Defense Fund

The National Corn Growers Association (NCGA) is joining forces with the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) to address one of the most pressing challenges for farmers, rural communities and natural resources – how to improve environmental outcomes while optimizing productivity and… Continue Reading →

Growth Energy Celebrates 10th Anniversary

Growth Energy was first announced this month in 2008 so they are now officially 10 years old. At the NAFB Convention Trade Talk last week, Growth Energy CEO Emily Skor shared some of the many accomplishments the organization has made… Continue Reading →

Songbirds set long-distance migration record

Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have studied flight routes to determine how far willow warblers migrate in the autumn. The results show that the willow warbler holds a long-distance migration record in the ten-gram weight category — with the… Continue Reading →

No link between ‘hypoallergenic’ dogs and lower risk of childhood asthma

Growing up with dogs is linked to a lower risk of asthma, especially if the dogs are female, a new study from Karolinska Institutet and Uppsala University in Sweden shows. However, the researchers found no relation between 'allergy friendly' breeds… Continue Reading →

What did birds and insects do during the 2017 solar eclipse?

In August of 2017, millions peered through protective eyewear at the solar eclipse — the first total eclipse visible in the continental United States in nearly 40 years. During the event, researchers from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology and the… Continue Reading →

Should you eat a low-gluten diet?

An increasing number of people choose a low-gluten diet, even though they are not allergic to the dietary substance. This trend has sparked public debate about whether or not low-gluten diets are recommendable for people without allergies. Now, researchers from… Continue Reading →

Population of rare Stone’s sheep 20% smaller than previously thought

The already-rare Stone's sheep of the Yukon is 20 per cent less common than previously thought, according to new research by University of Alberta biologists. The study examined 123 different DNA markers in approximately 2,800 thinhorn sheep in British Columbia… Continue Reading →

Humpback whales come to the Mediterranean to feed themselves

Although the presence of humpback whales in the Mediterranean has been considered unusual, it is known that their visits have increased in the last 150 years. Until now, there had been no clear reason to justify this fact, with various… Continue Reading →

Scorpion venom to shuttle drugs into the brain

The Peptides and Proteins lab at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) has published a paper in Chemical Communications describing the capacity of a small protein (a peptide) derived from chlorotoxin, found in scorpion venom (Giant Yellow Israeli… Continue Reading →

Android child’s face strikingly expressive

Japan's affection for robots is no secret. But is the feeling mutual in the country's amazing androids? We may now be a step closer to giving androids greater facial expressions to communicate with. While robots have featured in advances in… Continue Reading →

Insect antibiotic provides new way to eliminate bacteria

An antibiotic called thanatin attacks the way the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is built. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now found out that this happens through a previously unknown mechanism. Thanatin, produced naturally by the spined soldier… Continue Reading →

NASA learns more about interstellar visitor ‘Oumuamua

In November 2017, scientists pointed NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope toward the object known as 'Oumuamua — the first known interstellar object to visit our solar system. The infrared Spitzer was one of many telescopes pointed at 'Oumuamua in the weeks… Continue Reading →

Black Migrants: Photographs of California’s Forgotten Agricultural Past

California’s Latinx farmworkers have been the subjects of many documentary projects over the years, but very few people documented the history of Black farmworkers in the state. Now, an exhibition at the Fresno Museum of Art called Black Migrants features… Continue Reading →

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