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Date

November 16, 2018

USDA Won't Name Turkey Plants, Despite 164 Illnesses and 1 Death

The public doesn’t need to know which turkey plants have been found to be contaminated with a deadly strain of Salmonella that has infected people in 35 states, federal officials said yesterday in a strongly worded statement. Also, organizations such… Continue Reading →

Helping David Take on Goliath

Climate stewards take aim at herbicides, tout healthy soils It takes good soil for plants to grow healthy and vibrant. It takes brave souls to push for better legislation to make that happen. Last year, environmentalists and organic farmers scored… Continue Reading →

Mass HPV Vaccination Plan for the U.S.

The American Cancer Society (ACS) has set an aggressive goal to achieve an 80 percent uptake rate among American children with two doses human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine by 2026. To gain that coverage, 14 million more preteen children would need… Continue Reading →

How to Increase Lung Capacity

Because breathing is essential to life and your lungs are essential to breathing, I would like to share a number of tips to help you improve your lung capacity, which is a measure of how much air your body can… Continue Reading →

Scientist Replies to Aluminum Industry's and Medical Industry's False and Misleading Claims of Aluminum Safety

Aluminum.org is a pro-aluminum industry website. It even lists an Aluminum Caucus. This month, I decided to look into their list of “myths” about the safety of aluminum product they promote to see if their claims pass the proof-by-Pubmed test…. Continue Reading →

Treated superalloys demonstrate unprecedented heat resistance

Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory have discovered how to make "superalloys" even more super, extending useful life by thousands of hours. The discovery could improve materials performance for electrical generators and nuclear reactors. The key is to heat and cool… Continue Reading →

Newborn babies’ brain responses to being touched on the face measured for the first time

A newborn baby's brain responds to being touched on the face, according to new research co-led by UCL. Babies use this sense of touch — facial somatosensation — to find and latch onto their mother's nipple, and should have this… Continue Reading →

Color coded: Matching taste with color

Color can impact the taste of food, and our experiences and expectations can affect how we taste food, according to Penn State researchers, who suggest this may have implications for how food and beverage industries should market their products. "The… Continue Reading →

Dodging antibiotic resistance by curbing bacterial evolution

With many disease-causing bacteria ratcheting up their shields against current drugs, new tactics are vital to protect people from treatment-resistant infections. Lowering mutation rates in harmful bacteria might be an as yet untried way to hinder the emergence of antimicrobial-resistant… Continue Reading →

A new lead on a 50-year-old radiation damage mystery

For half a century, researchers have seen loops of displaced atoms appearing inside nuclear reactor steel after exposure to radiation, but no one could work out how. Now, a simulation done by researchers at the University of Michigan, Hunan University… Continue Reading →

From the ashes of a failed pain drug, a new therapeutic path emerges

A surprising discovery about a failed pain drug — and specifically, the pathway it targets, BH4 — could have implications for autoimmunity and cancer. Neuroscientists report that BH4 also functions as a kind of immunological thermostat, raising and lowering the… Continue Reading →

Overflowing crater lakes carved canyons across Mars

Today, most of the water on Mars is locked away in frozen ice caps. But billions of years ago it flowed freely across the surface, forming rushing rivers that emptied into craters, forming lakes and seas. New research led by… Continue Reading →

Majority of HIV persistence during ART due to infected cell proliferation

A majority of the HIV-infected cells that persist in HIV-infected individuals even during suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART) originated from cellular proliferation, not viral replication, according to new research published in Nature Communications. Reducing the population size of this "reservoir" of… Continue Reading →

Poncho/VOTiVO 2.0 Boosts Yields Again

BASF looks to bring even more yield to growers with Poncho® /VOTiVO® 2.0, adding a third mode of action to a trusted family of products. Since Poncho came on the scene in 2004, followed by Poncho/VOTiVO in 2011, the products… Continue Reading →

Communal rearing gives mice a competitive edge

Research by scientists at the University of Liverpool suggests that being raised communally makes mice more competitive when they're older. It is well known that in many animals, including humans, early-life experiences have long-lasting effects on the development of behaviours… Continue Reading →

PNW woodlands will be less vulnerable to drought, fire than Rocky Mountain, Sierra forests

Forests in the Pacific Northwest will be less vulnerable to drought and fire over the next three decades than those in the Rocky Mountains and Sierra Nevada, computer modeling by researchers in Oregon State University's College of Forestry shows. The… Continue Reading →

Different types of physical activity offer varying protection against heart disease

While it is well known that physical activity is important for heart health, neither research nor recommendations consistently differentiate between the benefits of different types of physical activity. New research, presented at the ACC Latin America Conference 2018 in Lima,… Continue Reading →

How head injuries lead to serious brain diseases

UCLA biologists have discovered how head injuries adversely affect individual cells and genes that can lead to serious brain disorders. The life scientists provide the first cell "atlas" of the hippocampus — the part of the brain that helps regulate… Continue Reading →

Zimfo Bytes 11/16

Farmer’s Business Network, Inc. is now offering a full range of crop insurance products and services through its affiliate FBN Insurance LLC. Farmers interested in new coverage offerings supported by FBN’s technology and analytical capabilities can get a free personal… Continue Reading →

Kilogram, ampere, kelvin and mole redefined

Today, in a landmark decision, representatives from 60 countries voted to redefine the International System of Units (SI), changing the world's definition of the kilogram, the ampere, the kelvin and the mole, forever. The decision, made at the General Conference… Continue Reading →

Half of the world’s annual precipitation falls in just 12 days

Currently, half of the world's measured precipitation that falls in a year falls in just 12 days, according to a new analysis of data collected at weather stations across the globe. By century's end, climate models project that this lopsided… Continue Reading →

Playing high school football changes the teenage brain

A single season of high school football may be enough to cause microscopic changes in the structure of the brain, according to a new study by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, Duke University and the University of North… Continue Reading →

Social isolation linked to higher risk of death

A large American Cancer Society study links social isolation with a higher risk of death from all causes combined and heart disease for all races studied, and with increased cancer mortality in white men and women. The study, appearing in… Continue Reading →

Artificial intelligence predicts treatment effectiveness

How can a doctor predict the treatment outcome of an individual patient? Traditionally, the effectiveness of medical treatments is studied by randomised trials where patients are randomly divided into two groups: one of the groups is given treatment, and the… Continue Reading →

Proteins cooperate to break up energy structures in oxygen starved heart cells

During a heart attack the supply of oxygen to heart cells is decreased. This reduced oxygen level, called hypoxia, causes the cell's powerhouses, the mitochondria, to fragment, impairing cell function and leading to heart failure. Until now, few details were… Continue Reading →

Universal laws in impact dynamics of dust agglomerates under microgravity conditions

Everybody is familiar with granular clusters — while making a cake in the kitchen, you see that the flour forms clumps. Porous dust agglomerates — clumps of clumps of dust grains — are considered to be building materials in the… Continue Reading →

Affordable catalyst for CO2 recycling

A catalyst for carbon dioxide recycling, Mineral pentlandite may also be a conceivable alternative to expensive precious metal catalysts. This is the result of a study conducted by researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum (RUB), Fritz-Haber Institute Berlin and Fraunhofer Umsicht in… Continue Reading →

The engineering work of ants can influence paleoclimatic studies

The paleontological site of Somosaguas (Madrid) hosts a large colony of ants of the species Messor barbarus. A study has now revealed that the daily activity of these insects modifies soil composition and therefore influences the results obtained in paleoclimatic… Continue Reading →

Long-term exposure to road traffic noise may increase the risk of obesity

Long term exposure to road traffic noise is associated with increased risk of obesity. This was the conclusion of a study involving the participation of the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal), a research centre supported by the "la Caixa"… Continue Reading →

Cells decide when to divide based on their internal clocks

The time of day, determined by a cell's internal clock, has a stronger influence on cell division than previously thought, reveals a new study. Cells replicate by dividing, but scientists still don't know exactly how they decide when to split…. Continue Reading →

Eleven seal species narrowly escaped extinction

Their fur was used as a raw material for coats; their fat was used for oil lamps and cosmetics: right up to the end of the nineteenth century, millions of seals were being hunted and killed every year worldwide. The… Continue Reading →

Controlling organ growth with light

In optogenetics, researchers use light to control protein activity. This technique allows them to alter the shape of embryonic tissue and to inhibit the development of abnormalities. Now, scientists in EMBL's De Renzis group have enhanced the technique to stop… Continue Reading →

Channels for the supply of energy

Working in cooperation with international colleagues, researchers from the University of Freiburg have described how water-insoluble membrane proteins are transported through the aqueous space between the mitochondrial membranes with the aid of chaperone proteins. The membrane proteins enable the cellular… Continue Reading →

3D chemical maps of single bacteria

Scientists at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) — a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at DOE's Brookhaven National Laboratory — have used ultrabright x-rays to image single bacteria with higher spatial resolution than… Continue Reading →

Gene editing possible for kidney disease

For the first time scientists have identified how to halt kidney disease in a life-limiting genetic condition, which may pave the way for personalised treatment in the future. Experts at Newcastle University, UK, have shown in a cell model and… Continue Reading →

Predatory behavior of Florida’s skull-collecting ant

"Add 'skull-collecting ant' to the list of strange creatures in Florida," says Adrian Smith a scientist at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences and North Carolina State University. His new research describes the behavioral and chemical strategies of a… Continue Reading →

New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease

Researchers have developed a new technique to analyse cell membrane proteins in situ which could revolutionise the way in which we study diseases, such as cancer, metabolic and heart diseases. The discovery was made as part of an international research… Continue Reading →

Human pharmaceuticals change cricket personality

Crickets that are exposed to human drugs that alter serotonin levels in the brain are less active and less aggressive than crickets that have had no drug exposure, according to a new study led by researchers from Linköping University. The… Continue Reading →

An Indigenous Alaskan Chef Shares Traditional Recipes By Way Of YouTube

Rob Kinneen didn’t take his first bite of fresh asparagus until adulthood, when he was a student at the Culinary Institute of America (CIA) in New York. “That was one of the first times I realized vegetables could taste good,”… Continue Reading →

Severe eczema may best be treated by allergy shots

If you've suffered with severe atopic dermatitis (eczema) for a long time and have tried what you think is every available option for relief, you may want to consider allergy shots. A medically-challenging case being presented at the American College… Continue Reading →

Milk allergy affects half of US food-allergic kids under age 1

Although parents often focus on peanuts as the food allergy they need to worry about most, cow's milk is the most common food allergy in children under the age of 5. New research being presented at the American College of… Continue Reading →

Sucking your baby’s pacifier to clean it may prevent allergies

If the thought of sucking your baby's pacifier to clean it and then popping it in your baby's mouth grosses you out, think again. New research being presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (ACAAI) Annual Scientific… Continue Reading →

Establishment of the immortalized cell line derived from Okinawa rail (endangered species)

The number of critically endangered animals has been increasing in recent years. According to data from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN), 1375 avian species are categorized as being endangered animals, and around 12% of the endangered… Continue Reading →

Safest way to dine out for those with food allergies is using up to 15 strategies

People with food allergies know eating at a restaurant means using multiple strategies to make sure your order doesn't contain something that could send you to the hospital with anaphylaxis — a severe life-threatening reaction. New research being presented at… Continue Reading →

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