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Late Miocene ape maxilla (upper jaw) discovered in western India

An ape maxilla (upper jaw) from the Late Miocene found in the Kutch basin, in western India, significantly extends the southern range of ancient apes in the Indian Peninsula, according to a study published in November 14, 2018 in the… Continue Reading →

How we use music as a possible sleep aid

Many individuals use music in the hope that it fights sleep difficulties, according to a study published November 14 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Tabitha Trahan of the University of Sheffield, UK, and colleagues. As described by the… Continue Reading →

Parents shouldn’t worry if their infant doesn’t sleep through the night by a year old

New parents often expect their baby to start sleeping through the night by around six months of age. Indeed, they often receive messages from paediatricians and others about the importance of early sleep consolidation. But authors of a study in… Continue Reading →

Symbiosis a driver of truffle diversity

While the sight of black or white truffle being shaved over on pasta is generally considered a sign of dining extravagance, they play an important role in soil ecosystem services. Truffles are the fruiting bodies of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungal… Continue Reading →

For arid, Mars-like Peruvian desert, rain brings death

When rains fell on the arid Atacama Desert, it was reasonable to expect floral blooms to follow. Instead, the water brought death. An international team of planetary astrobiologists has found that after encountering never-before-seen rainfall three years ago at the… Continue Reading →

Deep-time evolution of animal life on islands

Islands have been vital laboratories for advancing evolutionary theory since the pioneering work of Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace in the 19th century. Now, a new paper appearing in PLOS ONE from an international team of investigators describes two… Continue Reading →

First tally of US-Russia polar bears finds a healthy population

Not all polar bears are in the same dire situation due to retreating sea ice, at least not right now. Off the western coast of Alaska, the Chukchi Sea is rich in marine life, but the number of polar bears… Continue Reading →

Competition for shrinking groundwater

Groundwater, which has been used to irrigate crops, satiate livestock and quench thirst in general for thousands of years, continues to be a vital resource around the world. But according to research by Scott Jasechko and Debra Perrone, assistant professors… Continue Reading →

Alcohol ads with pro-drinking comments on Facebook boost desire to drink, study finds

Alcohol advertisements on social media sites such as Facebook can increase young adults' desire to drink if the ads contain pro-drinking comments from users. That's according to new research in the current issue of the Journal of Studies on Alcohol… Continue Reading →

Cold Super-Earth found orbiting closest single star to Sun

A planet has been detected orbiting Barnard's Star , a mere 6 light-years away. This breakthrough — announced in a paper published today in the journal Nature — is a result of the Red Dots and CARMENES projects, whose search… Continue Reading →

Researchers discover novel ‘to divide or to differentiate’ switch in plants

Scientists from VIB and Ghent University under the guidance of Prof. Dr. Jenny Russinova uncovered a novel mechanism in plants that controls an important decision step in stomatal lineage to divide asymmetrically or to differentiate. This is a decisive step… Continue Reading →

Tropical trees in the Andes are moving up — toward extinction

An international study led by University of Miami tropical biologists reveals that tropical trees are migrating upslope to escape climate change, but not fast enough. In the most comprehensive study of its kind, an international team of scientists led by… Continue Reading →

Climate simulations project wetter, windier hurricanes

New supercomputer simulations by climate scientists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) have shown that climate change intensified the amount of rainfall in recent hurricanes such as Katrina, Irma, and Maria by 5 to 10… Continue Reading →

Large areas of the Brazilian rainforest at risk of losing protection

Up to 15 million hectares of the Brazilian Amazon is at risk of losing its legal protection, according to a new study from researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden, and the University of… Continue Reading →

Seismic study reveals huge amount of water dragged into Earth’s interior

Slow-motion collisions of tectonic plates under the ocean drag about three times more water down into the deep Earth than previously estimated, according to a first-of-its-kind seismic study that spans the Mariana Trench. The observations from the deepest ocean trench… Continue Reading →

Recommending plants to benefit and attract pollinators

A survey was conducted by the University of Nebraska to unveil the extent to which horticultural employees are knowledgeable about pollinators. Carter Westerhold, Samuel Wortman, Kim Todd, and Douglas Golick sought to determine what plant and management recommendations these employees… Continue Reading →

A new approach to detecting cancer earlier from blood tests

Cancer scientists led by principal investigator Dr. Daniel De Carvalho at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre have combined "liquid biopsy," epigenetic alterations and machine learning to develop a blood test to detect and classify cancer at its earliest stages. The findings,… Continue Reading →

Houston’s urban sprawl increased rainfall, flooding during Hurricane Harvey

Houston's urban landscape directly contributed to the torrential rainfall and deadly flooding experienced during Hurricane Harvey in August 2017, according to Princeton and University of Iowa researchers. The researchers report in the journal Nature Nov. 15 that Houston's risk for… Continue Reading →

Putting food-safety detection in the hands of consumers

MIT Media Lab researchers have developed a wireless system that leverages the cheap RFID tags already on hundreds of billions of products to sense potential food contamination — with no hardware modifications needed. With the simple, scalable system, the researchers… Continue Reading →

Precision Ag Bytes 11/14

The Weed Science Society of America and its affiliated scientific societies have scheduled information-packed annual meetings over the coming months. Registration details for this year’s annual meeting of the Canadian Weed Science Society are available at www.weedscience.ca. Registration details for… Continue Reading →

Mothers infected by dengue may have babies with higher risk of severe Zika, and vice versa

Two new studies provide evidence that previous Dengue infection in pregnant mothers may lead to increased severity of Zika in babies, and that previous Zika infection in mice mothers may increase severity of Dengue infection in their pups. The research,… Continue Reading →

Bias-based bullying does more harm, is harder to protect against

A new study finds that bias-based bullying does more harm to students than generalized bullying, particularly for students who are targeted because of multiple identities, such as race and gender. What's more, the study finds that efforts to mitigate these… Continue Reading →

Climate control of Earth’s critical zone

We know less about the ground beneath our feet than we do about the surface of Mars, but new research by University of Colorado Boulder geoscientists shines a light on this hidden world from ridgetops to valley floors and shows… Continue Reading →

How exercise could help fight drug addiction

The siren call of addictive drugs can be hard to resist, and returning to the environment where drugs were previously taken can make resistance that much harder. However, addicts who exercise appear to be less vulnerable to the impact of… Continue Reading →

Rainforest vine compound starves pancreatic cancer cells

Pancreatic cancer cells are known for their ability to thrive under extreme conditions of low nutrients and oxygen, a trait known in the cancer field as "austerity." The cells' remarkable resistance to starvation is one reason why pancreatic cancer is… Continue Reading →

Older adults’ abstract reasoning ability predicts depressive symptoms over time

Age-related declines in abstract reasoning ability predict increasing depressive symptoms in subsequent years, according to data from a longitudinal study of older adults in Scotland. The research is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science…. Continue Reading →

Epoxy compound gets a graphene bump

Rice University scientists have built a better epoxy for electronic applications. Epoxy combined with "ultrastiff" graphene foam invented in the Rice lab of chemist James Tour is substantially tougher than pure epoxy and far more conductive than other epoxy composites… Continue Reading →

Middle Eastern desert dust on the Tibetan plateau could affect the Indian summer monsoon

More than a century ago, British meteorologist Henry Blanford noted a connection between springtime snow cover on the Tibetan Plateau and Himalaya mountain range and the intensity of the summer monsoon season in India. Hundreds of studies have supported this… Continue Reading →

Soil’s history: A solution to soluble phosphorus?

The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations estimates that around 45 million tons of phosphorus fertilizers will be used around the world in 2018. Much will be applied to soils that also received phosphorus fertilizers in past years…. Continue Reading →

Gravitational waves from a merged hyper-massive neutron star

For the first time astronomers have detected gravitational waves from a merged, hyper-massive neutron star. The scientists, Maurice van Putten of Sejong University in South Korea, and Massimo della Valle of the Osservatorio Astronomico de Capodimonte in Italy, publish their… Continue Reading →

Quantum science turns social

Researchers developed a versatile remote gaming interface that allowed external experts as well as hundreds of citizen scientists all over the world through multiplayer collaboration and in real time to optimize a quantum gas experiment in a lab at Aarhus… Continue Reading →

Salmon are shrinking and it shows in their genes

Male salmon are maturing earlier and becoming smaller, and it shows in their genes. This was the discovery of a study that examined scale samples from salmon in the River Teno in Northern Finland over a 40-year period, and looked… Continue Reading →

Diabetic foot ulcers heal quickly with nitric oxide technology

Diabetic foot ulcers can take up to 150 days to heal. A biomedical engineering team wants to reduce it to 21 days. They're planning to drop the healing time by amplifying what the body already does naturally: build layers of… Continue Reading →

Next step on the path towards an efficient biofuel cell

Fuel cells that work with the enzyme hydrogenase are, in principle, just as efficient as those that contain the expensive precious metal platinum as a catalyst. However, the enzymes need an aqueous environment, which makes it difficult for the starting… Continue Reading →

Earth’s magnetic field measured using artificial stars at 90 kilometers altitude

The mesosphere, at heights between 85 and 100 kilometers above the Earth's surface, contains a layer of atomic sodium. Astronomers use laser beams to create artificial stars, or laser guide stars (LGS), in this layer for improving the quality of… Continue Reading →

When electric fields make spins swirl

We are reaching the limits of silicon capabilities in terms of data storage density and speed of memory devices. One of the potential next-generation data storage elements is the magnetic skyrmion. A team at the Center for Correlated Electron Systems,… Continue Reading →

Nanotubes built from protein crystals: Breakthrough in biomolecular engineering

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have succeeded in constructing protein nanotubes from tiny scaffolds made by cross-linking of engineered protein crystals. The achievement could accelerate the development of artificial enzymes, nano-sized carriers and delivery systems for a… Continue Reading →

Checking very preterm babies’ head size can help identify long-term IQ problems

Regular measurements of head circumference of very preterm and full-term babies from an early age add valuable information when screening for long-term neurocognitive risk according to researchers from the University of Warwick and University of Tennessee, Knoxville. Very Preterm (VP)… Continue Reading →

Scientists engineer a functional optical lens out of 2D materials

In optics, the era of glass lenses may be waning. In recent years, physicists and engineers have been designing, constructing and testing different types of ultrathin materials that could replace the thick glass lenses used today in cameras and imaging… Continue Reading →

The Organic Food Industry Forges Its Own Path to Expand Growth

Should organic farmers and processors pool their money to create their own “checkoff” program used for industry-wide research and marketing much like other food industries do? (Think: “Got Milk?” or “Pork: The Other White Meat” and “Beef: Its What’s for… Continue Reading →

Venom shape untangles scorpion family tree

As a child growing up in Mexico, Carlos Santibanez-Lopez feared the scorpions that would often decorate the walls and ceilings of his home in search of a warm place with plenty of food. So when a college project sent him… Continue Reading →

Colder, darker climates increase alcohol consumption and liver disease

Where you live could influence how much you drink. According to new research from the University of Pittsburgh Division of Gastroenterology, people living in colder regions with less sunlight drink more alcohol than their warm-weather counterparts. The study, recently published… Continue Reading →

Urging House Democrats to Go Bold on Climate, Group Says Probing Fossil Fuel Giants Must Be a 'Top Priority'

"The science is clear: we need climate solutions now, and we don't have a moment to lose," 350.org declared in a new petition After Democratic leaders signaled in the lead-up to last week's midterms that they have no plans to… Continue Reading →

Time for a Climate Resilient Farm Bill

It is time for farmers and policy makers to jointly create a legislation that provides both for the survival of the planet and allows them to survive financially with ongoing taxpayer funding. There is no other sane option. At the… Continue Reading →

GMO Potatoes Are Here – How to Avoid Them

The genetically modified Innate potato was approved by the USDA in 2014. The “Innate” potato is a group of potato varieties that have had the same genetic alterations applied using a new form of genetic engineering known as RNA interference… Continue Reading →

Farmed Fish Are Depleting Oceans of Wild Fish

It's estimated that within the next 10 years, farm-raised fish will make up the majority of fish consumed by humans. There are already 100 species being farmed,1 and while aquaculture, as it's technically known, may sound like a sustainable alternative… Continue Reading →

Tell Whole Foods to Stop Selling Toxic GMO Potatoes!

Belong to campaign: Millions Against MonsantoCategory: All About Organics, Food Safety, Genetic EngineeringArea: USA Remember when Whole Foods promised consumers that by the end of 2018, all of its U.S. and Canada stores would require labels on any foods containing… Continue Reading →

So, you think you’re good at remembering faces, but terrible with names?

With the Christmas party season fast approaching, there will be plenty of opportunity to re-live the familiar, and excruciatingly-awkward, social situation of not being able to remember an acquaintance's name. This cringe-worthy experience leads many of us to believe we… Continue Reading →

John Deere and Pheasants Forever Working Together

A new partnership between John Deere and Pheasants Forever will promote conservation on the farm. “John Deere and Pheasants Forever just announced a new joint effort that will improve wildlife habitat across the country and provide discounts on select models… Continue Reading →

Pain can be a self-fulfilling prophecy

Expect a shot to hurt and it probably will, even if the needle poke isn't really so painful. Brace for a second shot and you'll likely flinch again, even though — second time around — you should know better. That's… Continue Reading →

If your diet fails, try again; your heart will thank you

During the holiday season, it can be difficult for even the most determined of us to stick to a healthy diet. A piece of Halloween candy here, a pumpkin spice latte there, and suddenly we're left feeling like we forgot… Continue Reading →

Optimization of alloy materials: Diffusion processes in nano particles decoded

Aluminium alloys have unique material properties and are indispensable materials in aircraft manufacturing and space technology. With the help of high-resolution electron tomography, researchers at TU Graz have for the first time been able to decode mechanisms crucial for understanding… Continue Reading →

Visualizing ‘unfurling’ microtubule growth

Living cells depend absolutely on tubulin, a protein that forms hollow tube-like polymers, called microtubules, that form scaffolding for moving materials inside the cell. Tubulin-based microtubule scaffolding allows cells to move, keeps things in place or moves them around. When… Continue Reading →

Synthetic DNA-delivered antibodies protect against Ebola in preclinical studies

Scientists at The Wistar Institute and collaborators have successfully engineered novel DNA-encoded monoclonal antibodies (DMAbs) targeting Zaire Ebolavirus that were effective in preclinical models. Study results, published online in Cell Reports, showed that DMAbs were expressed over a wide window… Continue Reading →

Carbon emissions will start to dictate stock prices

Companies that fail to curb their carbon output may eventually face the consequences of asset devaluation and stock price depreciation, according to a new study out of the University of Waterloo. The researchers further determined that the failure of companies… Continue Reading →

Your heart hates air pollution; portable filters could help

Microscopic particles floating in the air we breathe come from sources such as fossil fuel combustion, fires, cigarettes and vehicles. Known as fine particulate matter, this form of air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular and other serious health problems…. Continue Reading →

Hands-only CPR training kiosks can increase bystander intervention, improve survival

Prompt action from a bystander can impact the likelihood a person survives cardiac arrest that occurs outside of a hospital. One common and proven intervention that anyone can learn is Hands-Only Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR). Hands-Only CPR training kiosks are becoming… Continue Reading →

New methods to identify Alzheimer’s drug candidates with anti-aging properties

Old age is the greatest risk factor for many diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cancer. Geroprotectors are a recently identified class of anti-aging compounds. New Salk research has now identified a unique subclass of these compounds, dubbed geroneuroprotectors (GNPs),… Continue Reading →

Unintended consequences of dams and reservoirs

An international team of drought scientists show that while many dams and reservoirs are built, or expanded, to alleviate droughts and water shortages, they can paradoxically contribute to making them worse. The study is published in Nature Sustainability. Building dams… Continue Reading →

Overlooked trends in annual precipitation reveal underestimated risks worldwide

A reanalysis of worldwide annual trends in precipitation demonstrates that risk to human and environmental systems has been underestimated, according to a team of University of Maine researchers. As a result, they found more than 38 percent of the global… Continue Reading →

Why your number of romantic partners mirrors your mother

A new national study shows that people whose mothers had more partners — married or cohabiting — often follow the same path. Results suggest that mothers may pass on personality traits and relationship skills that make their children more or… Continue Reading →

Carbon goes with the flow

Many people see the carbon cycle as vertical — CO2 moving up and down between soil, plants and the atmosphere. However, new Michigan State University research published in the current issue of Geophysical Research Letters, adds a dimension to the… Continue Reading →

Congress Returns, Post-Election Agenda Looms 

Ag-vocates stand in front of the Capitol building. With a long to-do list in the lame duck session, ag-vocates will have an active role to play in getting sustainable ag priorities across the finish line. Photo credit: NSAC. After months… Continue Reading →

Scientists shed light on semiconductor degradation mechanism

Scientists at Nagoya Institute of Technology (NITech) and collaborating universities in Japan have gained new insights into the mechanisms behind degradation of a semiconductor material that is used in electronic devices. By highlighting the specific science behind how the material… Continue Reading →

Back-to-the-future plants give climate change insights

If you were to take a seed and zap it into the future to see how it will respond to climate change, how realistic might that prediction be? After all, seeds that actually grow in the future will have gone… Continue Reading →

‘Rare’ jellyfish not so rare

When the Rhizostoma luteum jellyfish was discovered at the beginning of the 19th century in the waters of the Strait of Gibraltar, only nine specimens were identified. For years, it was so inconspicuous that later, in the 20th century, it… Continue Reading →

Fish recognize their prey by electric colors

The African elephantnose fish generates weak electrical pulses to navigate its environment. This localization sense apparently shows an astonishing similarity to vision, as a study by the University of Bonn now shows. The study demonstrates that different objects have different… Continue Reading →

Weightlifting is good for your heart and it doesn’t take much

Lifting weights for less than an hour a week may reduce your risk for a heart attack or stroke by 40 to 70 percent, according to a new Iowa State University study. Spending more than an hour in the weight… Continue Reading →

‘Waltzing’ nanoparticles could advance search for better drug delivery methods

Indiana University researchers have discovered that drug-delivering nanoparticles attach to their targets differently based upon their position when they meet — like ballroom dancers who change their moves with the music. The study, published Nov. 13 in the journal ACS… Continue Reading →

Warmer winter temperatures linked to increased crime

Milder winter weather increased regional crime rates in the United States over the past several decades, according to new research that suggests crime is related to temperature's effect on daily activities. A new study published in GeoHealth, a journal of… Continue Reading →

New finding of particle physics may help to explain the absence of antimatter

In the Standard Model of particle physics, there is almost no difference between matter and antimatter. But there is an abundance of evidence that our observable universe is made up only of matter — if there was any antimatter, it… Continue Reading →

The dawn of a new era for genebanks

Biodiversity goes beyond species diversity. Another important aspect of biodiversity is genetic variation within species. A notable example is the immense variety of cultivars and landraces of crop plants and their wild progenitors. An international research consortium led by the… Continue Reading →

Moths and magnets could save lives

A new technology that relies on a moth-infecting virus and nanomagnets could be used to edit defective genes that give rise to diseases like sickle cell, muscular dystrophy and cystic fibrosis. Rice University bioengineer Gang Bao has combined magnetic nanoparticles… Continue Reading →

Deepwater Horizon oil spill’s dramatic effect on stingrays’ sensory abilities

It has been almost a decade since the Deepwater Horizon Oil spill. Described as the worst environmental disaster in the United States, nearly 5 million barrels of crude oil oozed into the Gulf of Mexico, severely degrading the marine ecosystem… Continue Reading →

The illusion of multitasking boosts performance

Our ability to do things well suffers when we try to complete several tasks at once, but a series of experiments suggests that merely believing that we're multitasking may boost our performance by making us more engaged in the tasks… Continue Reading →

Stealth-cap technology for light-emitting nanoparticles

A team of scientists from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), in collaboration with researchers from Monash University Australia, has succeeded in significantly increasing the stability and biocompatibility of special light-transducing nanoparticles. The team has developed the so-called "upconverting" nanoparticles that not… Continue Reading →

New scheduling system could help reduce flight delays

Scheduling and coordinating air traffic can be difficult, but taking the airlines' and passengers' delay costs into account can actually save airlines money and result in fewer delays, according to a new study from Binghamton University, State University of New… Continue Reading →

Detecting light in a ‘different dimension’

Scientists from the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) — a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory — have dramatically improved the response of graphene to light through self-assembling wire-like nanostructures that conduct… Continue Reading →

Arctic sea ice: Simulation versus observation

As an indicator of the impacts of climate change, Arctic sea ice is hard to beat. Scientists have observed the frozen polar ocean advance and retreat at this most sensitive region of the Earth over decades for insight on the… Continue Reading →

Solution in fight against fake graphene

Ever since the isolation of graphene was first achieved in 2004, there has been an explosion in graphene-related research and development, with hundreds of business opportunists producing graphene to capitalise on this rapidly expanding industry. However, a new study by… Continue Reading →

Emotional intelligence: A new criterion for hiring?

The cognitive skills and personality of a future employee are examined during a job interview: does the candidate have the right training? The right career history? Does he present himself well? And is he affable? However, qualifications and a nice… Continue Reading →

Doubly-excited electrons reach new energy states

Positrons are short-lived subatomic particle with the same mass as electrons and a positive charge. They are used in medicine, e.g. in positron emission tomography (PET), a diagnostic imaging method for metabolic disorders. Positrons also exist as negatively charged ions,… Continue Reading →

Tailoring the surface of carbon may hold the key to monitoring patient blood in real-time

Thanks to the development of a new computational model, Postdoctoral Researcher Miguel Caro is spearheading work on tailor-made carbon surfaces by researchers at Aalto University, who work in partnership with Professor Gabor Csanyi and Dr Volker Deringer from Cambridge University…. Continue Reading →

Autism behaviors show unique brain network fingerprints in infants

A new study has identified unique functional brain networks associated with characteristic behaviors of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in 12- and 24-month old children at risk for developing ASD. The study is published in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging…. Continue Reading →

Microorganisms help production

Oil is still the most economically attractive resource for fuels and basic chemicals that can be used to manufacture everyday products such as plastic bottles and detergent. New biotechnological processes aim to simplify the use of renewable biomass as an… Continue Reading →

Rising sea levels may build, rather than destroy, coral reef islands

Rising global sea levels may actually be beneficial to the long-term future of coral reef islands, such as the Maldives, according to new research published in Geophysical Research Letters. Low-lying coral reef islands are typically less than three metres above… Continue Reading →

Months After Hurricane Florence, Undocumented Farmworkers Still Struggle to Recover

The day after Hurricane Florence plowed through eastern North Carolina—Saturday, September 15—Isabel sat on the couch in her mobile home in Lenoir County and counted out some cash. Calculating how much water and food her family needed, she was prepped… Continue Reading →

Business as usual for Antarctic krill despite ocean acidification

While previous studies indicate some life stages of Antarctic krill may be vulnerable to ocean acidification, the research published in the Nature journal Communications Biology found that adult krill were largely unaffected by ocean acidification levels predicted within the next… Continue Reading →

Climate change damaging male fertility

Climate change could pose a threat to male fertility — according to new research from the University of East Anglia. New findings published today in the journal Nature Communications reveal that heatwaves damage sperm in insects — with negative impacts… Continue Reading →

Treating obesity: One size does not fit all

Analyzing data from more than 2,400 obese patients who underwent bariatric weight-loss surgery, researchers identified at least four different patient subgroups that diverge significantly in eating behaviors and rate of diabetes, as well as weight loss in three years after… Continue Reading →

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